Magick Run Amok

 

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In Book #3 of her popular Abracadabra series, author Sharon Pape delivers a cozy mystery with a twist of the paranormal and a splash of humor. Her protagonist, Kailyn Wilde, is a sorcerer of ancient lineage, has a knack for solving murder cases with help from her journalist boyfriend, psychic aunt, and an aged Merlin. Let this magical read begin!

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

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Q: Many successful writers had their passion for the written word ignited by a love of reading since childhood. Was that the case for you?

A: Yes, I’ve always loved reading, but because my passion for writing began as soon as I was taught to string words together to form a sentence, I think it also had roots in my DNA or perhaps a previous lifetime. Can you tell I like the paranormal and questions for which there are no definite answers?

Q: What are some of the books we might have found on the nightstand of your adolescent self? And as a teenager? And an adult?

A:  When I was an adolescent, the books on my nightstand would have included The Diary of Anne Frank, The Dana Girls mystery series by Carolyn Keene as well as Enid Blyton’s mysteries, Gone with the Wind, Mrs. Mike, Our Hearts Were Young and Gay, and Seventeen, by Booth Tarkington.

In my teens, you might have found Rebecca (Daphne Du Maurier), Exodus (Uris), Hawaii (Michener), Advise and Consent (Drury), The Winter of Our Discontent (Steinbeck), For Whom the Bell Tolls (Hemingway) and nonfiction works about the universe.

Since I’ve been an adult, the books would include: The Stand and others by Stephen King, Watchers and others by Dean Koontz, The Red Tent by Anita Diamant, Olivia and Jai by Rebecca Ryman, When God was a Woman, Mary Stewart’s trilogy about Merlin, Life After Life, Many Lives, Many Masters by Brian Weiss, MD, The Right Stuff (Wolfe), A Brief History of Time (Hawking), The Martian Chronicles, The Rent Collector, The Orphan Train, The Last Day (Klierer), The Light Between Oceans (Stedman), Me Before You (Moyer) lots of mysteries, and science fiction.

Q: Does one book in particular stand out as your all-time favorite?

A: Gone With the Wind. I’m sure the book’s impact on me had a lot to do with the young age at which I read it. I was drawn in by the sweeping romance of Scarlet and Rhett and by the dramatic period during which it took place. It didn’t hurt that the copy I read had photos of Clark Gable and Vivian Leigh from the movie. I’d still take Gable over any number of today’s actors.

Q: If you could step into the shoes of any fictitious character for 24 hours, who would it be, where would you go and what would you do?

A: I would like to be Captain James T. Kirk on the starship Enterprise during the episode “The Trouble With Tribbles.” It would be like playing with hundreds of puppies!

Q: Who are some of the authors you believe had an influence on your own style of storytelling?

 A: I think every book I’ve read has influenced my writing style, to one degree or another. You can’t beat King and Koontz for making you feel like you’re right there in the scene or M.L. Stedman for the sheer beauty of her writing. Backing up a minute, when my kids were little, I was reading The Stand by King just before I had to leave the house to pick up my daughter from nursery school. As I pulled out of the garage, there was a weird moment when I expected to see dead people everywhere.

Q: What’s the first thing you ever had published?

A: My first book sold to PocketBooks. It was entitled For Everything a Season, but since there was no paranormal genre at the time, the publisher changed the title to Ghost Fire and marketed it as horror. Redbook condensed it for their Halloween issue. It was the first paperback original they had ever condensed. When the rights reverted to me, I rewrote portions of the book and re-released it on Amazon with my original title.

Q: What was the inspiration for your Abracadabra Mysteries?

A:  Mary Stewart’s trilogy about Merlin was my inspiration. I found myself thinking what if there was a family of sorcerers who could trace their lineage back to this great mythical figure who exits in everyone’s psyche? And what if Merlin, somewhat in his dotage, were to show up in their magick shop in the present? I knew I’d have fun writing a cozy mystery series around that premise.

Q: You’ve described these books as “cozy mysteries.” For readers unfamiliar with this subgenre, what elements define the cozy label?

A: Agatha Christie’s mysteries gave birth to the cozies. Like her books, cozies have no overt sex or violence. The characters can fall in love, but they leave the reader at the bedroom door. People are murdered, but the grisly details are left to the reader’s imagination. Cozies often have funny elements as well.

Q: What are some of the challenges/joys inherent in penning a series versus a stand-alone novel? 

 A: With a series, I can keep working with the characters I created and love. In addition, the characters and their relationships can change and evolve as the series moves along. In my cozies, I always have a secondary story line that runs through all the books in the series. In Abracadabra that subplot is about Merlin.

The one big challenge for me in writing a series is keeping track of all the little details so that something in book 3 doesn’t contradict something in book 1.

Q: Describe your writing process. Do you outline or allow the plot to develop as you write?

A: I’ve tried to outline, but it’s too stiff a method for me. When I start writing a mystery, I know the victim, the killer and his motivation. However I did change killers near the end of one book and it made for a much better ending. I’m always a bit amazed by the way all the pieces fall into place by the end.

Q: Do your characters ever surprise you and make choices you hadn’t expected?

A: All the time. The other day my characters tried to run away with the plot. I caught them in time, but it wasn’t a pretty scene.

Q: How have your books come to be titled?    

A: With the exception of my first book, the publishers have accepted my titles. My first cozy series was about a police sketch artist and the ghost of a federal marshal from the Arizona Territory. I used the word sketch in each title as in, Sketch Me If You Can. I find that if I choose the title first, it automatically suggests the plot. When I came up with Sketcher in the Rye, the plot popped right into my head.

Q: A witch, a vampire and a werewolf walk into a bar. No, seriously. If you had to have one of these paranormal beings as a roommate for a month, who would you choose and why?

A: I’d take the witch, but only if she’s into white magic and can wiggle her nose to clean the house.

Q: The protagonist of your Abracadabra novels has a long association with all things magical. If you could be granted any special power to assist in your workaday life, what would it be?

A: I’d take teleportation. It would save a lot on car maintenance and gas, and I wouldn’t have to pack for a trip. I could just teleport home for whatever I needed.

Q: The advent of self-publishing has made no shortage of creative avenues “magically” accessible to today’s writers. What, then, governed your own decision to pursue the traditional route?

A: I guess I’m an old fashioned girl. My first three books were published in the dark ages – before the internet. I know that self-publishing gives the author more freedom, but I don’t want the freedom to search for a good editor or a great cover artist or a marketing team. I prefer to spend my time writing. As it is, I’ll never have enough time to write all the stories in my head.

Q: What are you doing to promote your work and which strategies have been the most successful for you?

A: I promote my work on social media platforms and I have a website. I was one of the authors blogging on Killer Characters for a couple of years. I hold giveaways of my books and I’ve done some book fairs. I also like to cross promote with other cozy authors. It’s hard to determine what method has been the most successful, but I think book fairs have been the least.

Q: What is one question you hear too often in interviews? And a question that you wish someone would ask?

A: “Why did you start writing?” It’s part of every interview. One I’d like to be asked, “What other forms of writing have you tried?” A: I’ve written poetry all my life, but I’ve never tried to have it published. I wrote a stage play, because I needed to get the subject out of my head. It sits in my filing cabinet. I’ve written a few screenplays, the most recent of which I’m going to try to market. Years ago I tried my hand at an original sitcom and was thrilled to get a note back from Norman Lear saying it wasn’t right for them at the time, but to please send along anything else I write. I never pursued it, because selling to Hollywood without previous credits is as tough as it gets. But then I forgot my own advice and I wrote an episode for Star Trek: Next Generation. Hope is a great and awful thing. I found a west coast agent to represent me. She told me there was interest and then fell off the face of the earth – drug problem from what I heard. Writing for any ongoing series is just about impossible. They have show runners and a staff of writers from the get-go. Unfortunately the ideas in my head present themselves in many forms and refuse to learn what is and isn’t possible.

Q: If there’s one thing that no amount of wishing can make disappear with a wand or a secret spell, it’s a diagnosis of breast cancer—a challenge with which you—as a cancer survivor—are personally familiar. Tell us about your journey back to wellness and what inspired you to reach out and help other women not only survive but thrive.

A: I was very lucky with the breast cancer, but it was a realization that took me a little while to accept. I was forty-five at the time and thankfully it was caught at an early stage. I was fortunate to have a skilled and caring surgical oncologist, a wonderfully supportive husband, family and friends. But I didn’t know anyone who had ever gone through breast cancer, so there were times I felt very alone.

After recovering from surgery and reconstruction, I wanted to help other women who were recently diagnosed. I wanted to be their “someone” who’d gone through it. I became a Reach to Recovery volunteer for the American Cancer Society and went on to become the coordinator for the program in Nassau and Suffolk Counties on Long Island. When my surgeon asked me to start a similar program within his practice, I was happy to help out. With the help of two other volunteers, we created a nonprofit to provide information and peer support to his patients. When the organization hit its ten year mark and was running smoothly, I resigned to pursue my writing once again.

Q: If your favorite quote were put on a tee-shirt, what would it say and why does this quote resonate with you?

A: “It’s never too late to be what you might have been,” George Eliot. This quote reminds us that at any stage of life we have the ability to reach for goals. We only fail when we give up.

Q: What are you working on now?

A: I’m writing the fifth book in the Abracadabra cozy mystery series.

Q: Anything else you’d like to share?

A:  Although my husband and I watch our kids’ dogs when they’re at work, it’s time for us to have another dog of our own. We’re thinking we’d like a golden retriever mix and have applications in with a couple of rescue groups. We’re trying to be patient and wait for someone who’ll be the right match for us.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you?

A:   They can visit my website: https://sharonpape.com/

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The View From Mars

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Many stories are about protagonists who somehow manage to balance completing schoolwork, falling in love, and saving the world all at the same time. But let’s be honest, that’s not how life usually works. The View From Mars by Seth Larsen and his twins, Dylan and Kai Larsen, presents the wonderfully crafted tale of a young boy named Mars who is trying to juggle living in a new state, protecting his family, and saving his parents’ marriage. Relatable, enthralling, and humorous—this coming-of-age story is one you definitely won’t want to miss!

Interviewer: Sophie Lin

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 Q: Why did you decide to write a book with your children?

 A: The seed was that I wanted to connect and spend more time with my twins Daylen and Kai, who were in fifth grade at the time. I knew they enjoyed creative writing—they sometimes write short stories just for fun, the same way I did when I was their age. I suggested the idea of writing a book together, and they immediately said yes. I cautioned that we’d have to meet regularly, and it would take a long time, but that didn’t temper their enthusiasm at all. We didn’t fully understand what we were getting into, but before any of us knew it, we were off and running.

Q: What inspired you to become a writer?

 A: I’ve loved writing stories ever since I was a kid. When I was eleven or twelve, I would hole up in my room to write ambitious stories, although I rarely finished them. I used to watch sporting events on TV and write articles about what I saw—then compare it to the article in the newspaper the next day, to see “who did it better.” I moved to Los Angeles after college to try and make a go of it as a writer. I was never really able to make a living from it, but I’ve never stopped writing in one form or another. It’s just too much of my DNA—I couldn’t stop if I wanted to.

Q: Who came up with the idea for Mars?

 A: From the outset, we spent quite a bit of time coming up with a catchy title for the book. We wanted it to be kind of a play on the character’s name—something that conveyed a specific point of view. After bouncing around countless character names and title ideas, we arrived at the name and title. It’s unusual to come up with the title first, but we wanted to have an idea and concept to keep returning to—something that would sustain our inspiration. We all agreed that we wanted a “fish out of water” character, because those were the types of characters my twins really enjoyed reading. My kids enjoyed the Diary of a Wimpy Kid book series, and I showed them some episodes of one of my favorite TV shows from childhood, “The Wonder Years.” We definitely wanted a mix of humor and real life. From there, most of the characters came from the minds of Daylen and Kai. I asked a lot of questions, and helped shape the overall story arc (and the grammar!).

Q: What was your process for writing The View From Mars, considering that you had three writers and two illustrators?

 A: My twins and I met up Wednesdays and Sunday nights. Initially, these were whiteboard sessions, and our ideas were all over the place. We focused on characters—developing people that would be fun to write…flawed people that you could take a journey with. Once we felt we had a strong set of characters that would generate conflict with one another, we developed story lines and character arcs for each of the primary characters. Nearly all of the story points were conjured up by Daylen and Kai. We jotted down countless ideas for specific chapters, many of which were based on things that had happened to my twins (or to me when I was their age), and things that we’d observed on the playground. My role was to help us connect these ideas into coherent story lines and themes…making sure the story was building toward something, with an effective set-up and pay-off. My other two kids, Savahn (aka Shiu Shiu) and Seth (aka Sumo), had been expressing an interest in being involved in the creative process somehow. Savahn loves art and drawing, so I suggested she illustrate—and she was really excited about that. Sumo isn’t necessarily wired toward art in the way my daughter is, but he has a great sense of humor and helped integrate that into the drawings. Besides, we couldn’t leave him out! Once we finished the first draft of the book, Daylen and Kai began describing the scenes to Savahn and Sumo so that they could start creating looks for each of the characters. After a series of revisions between the kids that was surprisingly collaborative and mature, they started generating drawings that could be used in the book. Then we all voted on which ones made the most sense to include.

Q: What was your greatest challenge while writing this book?

 A: Without question, the biggest obstacle was time. For the twins, balancing their schoolwork and activities with writing the book. For me, balancing the commitments of being a husband, a father of four, and fitting in my actual day job. That’s why it took a year and a half from our first meeting to having an actual book in hand.

Q: How did writing this book affect your relationship with your kids?

 A: Writing this book was easily one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done. It benefited our relationship in ways I didn’t anticipate. The twins always really looked forward to our writing sessions, and so did I. I expected that. But the surprise for me was that it helped them see me as more of a “person” with actual feelings than just a robotic “dad.” When Daylen and Kai would toss out story ideas based on things they were dealing with, or things their friends were dealing with, it gave me the space to say, “Oh, yeah—that happened to me when I was your age, too.” I’d proceed to tell them these childhood stories, sometimes things that I hadn’t even thought about in 35 years. It gave them a perspective and an understanding of me that they would have never otherwise had. You could literally see their eyes widen—it blew their minds that I’d gone through many of the same emotions and feelings they’re going through now. And many of these things wove their way into our book, one way or the other. It was a special time that we’ll share for the rest of our lives.

Q: What advice would you give someone around Mars’s age to survive becoming a teenager?

 A: Life is messy. But it can also be full of beautiful moments if you choose to recognize them. Realize that you can work through life’s challenges, and there can be positive outcomes, even if they aren’t always wrapped up nicely in a bow.

Q: How was your publishing experience?

 A: Our publishing experience was very positive. We didn’t want to self-publish because we didn’t have money to spend upfront, and also didn’t want the stress of potentially carrying a lot of inventory that we were desperate to sell. So, we went the publishing-on-demand route. We used CreateSpace for the paperback, where you send them your files, and when people order through Amazon, the book is printed and sent. They, of course, take a healthy percentage of the profits, but we aren’t risking our own money—and it’s relatively easy and stress-free on our side. CreateSpace doesn’t do hard cover versions of books though. We knew we wanted a hardcover version because artistically they’re just cool, and also we found out that libraries prefer hardcover—and we knew we wanted to try and get our book in the LA County library (which we ultimately did!). For our hardcover version, we used Ingram Spark, who works with Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and most distributors. When someone buys the book through any of those channels, Ingram Spark prints the book, and it ultimately gets to where it needs to go.

Q: This book covers some pretty heavy topics, such as bullying and parental separation. Why did you choose to write about these issues?

 A: We wanted the book to include some daunting challenges for the characters because that’s more interesting dramatically, but we also wanted the book to be relatable. We wanted sixth graders and young teens to read the book and immediately identify with the characters and what they’re going through. We wanted to deal with these things honestly, and with humor where possible. In one form or another, my twins and I have wrestled with many of the things described in the book, or been close to similar situations. Real life, after all, informed the book.

Q: If there was one message that a reader could take away from reading your book, what would you want it to be?

 A: We have precious few family rules, but one of them is, “Always protect your family.” Sometimes it’s all you have, and the fabric of your family is only as strong as you make it. My wife and I drill this message into our kids all the time, because we believe it’ll carry them through life’s challenges into adulthood, long after we’re gone. That’s not to say the family isn’t full of its own complexities and conflict, but we have a deep desire for our kids to remain close. Thematically in our book, Mars and his siblings desperately want to get their parents back together, which is a beautiful thing, even if the way they go about it is naïve (and dishonest!). Mars’ brother and sister drive him nuts, too, but you can tell the love they have for each other.

Q: Are you working on any other projects (like a sequel!) that we should keep an eye out for?

 A: Yes, we plan on writing a sequel. Savahn and Sumo also want to work on spin-off books, focusing on the journeys of the siblings. Ideas aren’t fully baked, but we’ll get there.

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?

 A: Fun fact: Mars’ younger brother is named Sumo. The character was heavily influenced by their real-life brother “Sumo.” The character name was a placeholder, and we never found a better name, so it stuck.

 

Keeping The Balance

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It’s challenging enough for most of us to deal with the Here and Now, with the interactions we have with others and the oftentimes complicated relationship we have with our own selves. But what happens when disruptions come from otherworldly forces that are beyond our comprehension, frame of reference and personal control? In her new book, Keeping the Balance, Sue Churchill taps the spiritual clearance work that she and her husband do in order to help their clients resolve psychic attacks, spirit possession and residual energies associated with paranormal activity.

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

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 Q: What attracted you to the realm of spirituality?

A: My parents were spiritualists, so it was always an open subject in our house. I questioned my own beliefs when I was in my teens as I had an interest in different religions but, in my heart, I felt that the soul or spirit surviving physical death was the truth. I spent many years developing my mediumship skills through joining different development groups. I am still developing; it is a life-long lesson. Apart from learning how to connect with spirit, I was introduced to healing and rescue work. My husband, Mick, who I work with spiritually, thankfully shared my interest and he also started to work on his development and we attended several groups together. I spent several years serving spiritualist churches as a medium: we both also began training as spiritual healers and embarked on our journey conducting spiritual clearances. This started after we experienced our own spiritual activity and worked with a medium to resolve it. Our first case was helping a close friend and gradually more people needing help were guided to us: we were broken in gently and developed more skills with each situation. Sensitive communication skills are central to spiritual working; many people you deal with are distressed and they find themselves in scary situations which they don’t understand. Mick is a trained bereavement counsellor and I have spent many years in the field of care and care training; this has given us both useful communication tools for interacting with people and handling sensitive situations.

Q: How does your background in spirituality interface with your journey as a writer?

A: I find they work quite well together. Prior to writing and publishing my first book, I had only ever composed small “inspirational prose” pieces. I wasn’t an organized writer, I would feel inspired with a few words and set them down on whatever I could find at the time. I believe some of what I wrote was inspired by spirit and served to provide philosophical insight to help with comprehending the spirit world. A medium once advised me that any philosophy I received from spirit was not specifically for me, it should be shared with others to promote a wider learning. My book explains some of the work we have done which may help others understand their own situations and how to find help as well as provide them with a better understanding and food for thought to inspire and assist them on their own spiritual journey.

Q: What was your inspiration for writing this book?

A: I noticed many of our clients we had helped spiritually were very interested in the work which we did. In 2014 I broke my arm and was unable to go to work for about three months. It was then I had the time to write so I simply started writing about some of the cases we had resolved. I wanted to help people understand what we did, how we did it and about the knowledge of life-after-death and spiritual aspects which we had learned over time. I also hoped the book would help people who are experiencing paranormal activity or spiritual problems to understand more about them and where they can go to get help.

Q: What does the title mean?

A: From my title, Keeping The Balance, it isn’t clear what the book is about, hence, the subtitle: Our Journey Through Spiritual Hell. This still doesn’t fully explain but it at least highlights the subject area. I see the spiritual work we do as tipping the scales towards the light. In my view there are many energies in the universe, most of them not yet recognised nor understood by science and mankind generally. On the one hand there is positive or good energy and on the other there is negative or dark energy. There is a constant battle between these energies to overcome each other and gain some ground. We play our part to ensure the positive energy stays strong and keep the negative energy at bay: we are keeping the balance.

Q: Paranormal activity and problems don’t happen to everyone. Are there contributory factors which can lead to a person being affected versus being left alone?

A: It doesn’t affect everyone, but it can affect anyone and there isn’t one single factor which may cause it to happen. A common question we have been asked by the people we help is, “Why me?” Sometimes there may be environmental reasons for a person or household being affected: energy lines or leys may be causing more spiritual activity or exacerbating it. Historically, there may have been distressing and fatal accidents or events in the area resulting in many lost souls who need help crossing over. Some properties are very close to electricity pylons; pylons emit high amounts of electro – magnetic energy and this can cause people to experience goose bumps, mood changes and paranoia which can be mistaken for paranormal experiences. Difficult personal circumstances causing low mood, anxiety or depression may leave a person more vulnerable as negative energy can build up around them. As the negative energy grows, it will then affect them causing their low mood to worsen and intensifying the negative energy. A concentration of negative energy may cause problems and attract more energies and spirits. There is a lot to be said for confronting and trying to deal with your feelings and trying to keep positive. Personal spiritual protection for those who undertake paranormal investigation or spiritual work is important. Without it, a person can be vulnerable to attack or attachment by spirit and energies.

Q: Have you ever been attacked by spirits or experienced any unpleasant episodes of your own?

A: During one difficult case where a woman was possessed, and it required many visits to resolve, my husband was almost dragged out of bed by a spirit. He awoke in the early hours of the morning to find something had hold of his leg and was pulling it. He called out to wake me up and between us we managed to clear the energy. It was very unnerving. Due to the nature of our work to help people who are undergoing spiritual attacks or activity, we have found this can render us targets. We often find that prior to our first visit we experience negative spiritual activity at home or things crop up to stop or deter us from visiting. We have learned how to protect ourselves effectively and deal with anything which happens to us, but we still have to be on our guard.

Q: Conversely, have you ever had pleasant/positive experiences from paranormal interventions?

A: Helping a person plagued by unwanted and often negative spiritual activity where the result is peace for them gives us a good feeling and an awareness we have achieved something positive. In addition, some of the work we carry out involves spirit rescue—guiding lost and trapped souls to the light where they can find healing, understanding and continue their own journey in the spirit world. On one occasion, a few days after one such case, the spirit of the man we had helped over appeared before my husband; he immediately thought he hadn’t passed over, it hadn’t worked, and he was still earthbound. As the man smiled and then faded, my husband realized he had simply returned to thank him—a good and rewarding result.

Q: If books are judged by their covers (and I truly believe they are), what do you feel your own cover design says about what prospective readers can expect from the content?

A:  I wanted the cover to be eye-catching and sum up the philosophy of the book and our spiritual work. Mick had the initial vision of what he felt would look good and symbolise our spiritual work. He loves images of the grim reaper so that was a must, plus he felt it was a good representation of death. He felt the yin and yang symbol superimposed on an image of the earth held in the reaper’s hand would sum up the wider message in the book—yin and yang representing the balance of energies and the reaper holding that balance in his hand. Once he had the ideas and some images for the cover, an artist friend of our son came up with the final design. We both liked images of the moonlight through trees so that was a perfect choice for the background. I just hope readers won’t see the cover design as being too scary!

Q: What was your experience like in finding a publisher?

A: Although I started writing in 2014, I didn’t finish my book until early this year. I had investigated the process of publishing and I felt very overwhelmed, so I concentrated on finishing the book. I looked at companies who can sell you a package with different levels of help to publish. I was quite keen on this method until I realised that the company own the ISBN and rights. Our youngest son came to the rescue and introduced me to self-publishing. He published his first book towards the end of 2017; he managed it very quickly as he wanted it to be out before Christmas. He introduced me to Createspace and was there for me when I had little niggles and questions. I initially published in paperback and I found the guide they provide very useful and explanatory. Once it was live I decided to look at doing an electronic version. Personally, I like a proper book but I realise so many people prefer electronic now. I am quite good with computers but not an expert and it took me about three solid days to get my book Kindle-ready. My advice for anyone publishing for Kindle is to download everything available from the site to help you format your book so it is Kindle-ready.

Q: What are you doing to market it?

A: As a virgin author who self-published, I haven’t found it easy. I didn’t have the foresight to think about marketing prior to publishing. I was too busy working and trying to finish the book when I had spare time. After an intense couple of weeks in the final stages of publishing, the book was live, and I finally relaxed for a moment. I then realised I needed to market it. I regularly share my book and links to it over social media, trying to target those who have a spiritual interest and I share on pages used by potential readers such as paranormal investigators, mediums and healers. I recently discovered Book Connectors on Facebook which is a very friendly, helpful group where you can find bloggers, other authors and advice. I have also sent copies to spiritual publications and asked for a review. I have paid for two adverts. The first was in a popular spiritual magazine with a good distribution; it cost around £50 for a small paragraph with colour picture. I then came across a US company online, Whizbuzz Books. Your book remains on their site forever and they also advertise it regularly over the whole range of social media for a year; you can include a decent size description and links to your own website. Unless you have deep pockets, you must be resourceful to find as much free advertising as you can.

 Q: Your book addresses spiritual areas and beliefs which many may see as controversial or unbelievable. Do you think it would be well received or of interest to those from different belief systems?

A: I hope so, as many people are exploring different philosophies nowadays and seeking answers. Part 1 of the book describes a cross section of the spiritual clearance cases we have resolved and is, therefore, factual. However, each of these clients were from different backgrounds and belief systems. I explain how we conducted each clearance and how, in some cases we adapted according to the beliefs or religion of the client in question. Negative spiritual activity does not discriminate, it can affect anyone. One of our clients was Catholic and her parents were Baptist. After we helped her, I talked her through methods and techniques for keeping positive, moving forward and protection. She liked to use prayer and I supported that because it was her belief and her confidence in prayer which helped her through this negative episode. In Part 2, I speculate and theorise around spiritualism and belief systems which I hope will encourage readers to explore for themselves. I make it very clear my conjecture is according to our experiences and how my understanding and knowledge has grown from them.

Q: There are lots of books about spirituality out there. A simple search on Amazon, for instance, reveals over 60,000. Can books help readers glean a better understanding of spiritual subjects? If so, how do they possibly go about choosing which ones will be the best fit for them?

A: Books can help immensely with gaining a basic understanding of many areas and helping an individual look at the different paths. There are many which provide fundamental information on auras, chakra, meditation and spiritual protection. However, I feel it’s important to remember that some of the information written will be the authors’ opinion, not necessarily fact. When choosing a book, you may have specific authors or books which have been recommended to you, but it’s still difficult to select which is right for you. Have a good look through bookstores. Amazon is great as there is so much choice but that isn’t always helpful. Going to a good book shop and taking your time to browse is often better. There’s nothing like handling a book to get a feel for what it is like. If it seems to be right for the subject area you’re seeking, then go with your gut feeling for which is best—the one which feels right, the one your eyes want to go back to. Listen to your intuition. Never take everything as gospel. You will begin to recognise authors you like or indeed practitioners, like us, who publish their experiences.

Q: If readers are having spiritual problems, what do you recommend as a starting point for them to seek resolution?

A: It depends on the person affected and their beliefs. A strongly religious person may be better off approaching their own minister for advice as a first step. Otherwise, I would suggest a local spiritualist church or centre or a recommended paranormal investigation group. Spiritualist churches (you can find lists on the Internet), will usually be able to help or suggest a local medium who is able to help. I strongly advise against finding a medium, psychic or paranormal investigation group online unless they have been recommended or you are able to check them; there are so many who do not know what they are doing.

Q: What’s your advice for fellow wordsmiths who—like you—are planning to write their first book?

A: My advice is, do it! Life is for doing, not for regretting missed opportunities. Last year I enrolled on a distance learning creative writing course which I am finding very beneficial and I would recommend. Not only does it help with writing styles for different genres, it also teaches the processes for progression in different areas of professional writing. For this book, I did no planning, I just started writing and although it worked quite well as it is non-fiction, it did cause me more work going back and forth and re reading to complete. I would also advise making a careful note of any quotations or references to other works so when it comes to acknowledging them, they are easy to find, and you don’t miss any.

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?

A: For anyone who is experiencing upsetting spiritual activity or problems, no, you are not mad. Don’t suffer alone in silence; seek help. You can check out our website or contact for a chat https://suechurchill966.wixsite.com/spiritualbalance and suechurchill966@yahoo.com. If you’re a new writer, there are many people out there who are keen to help you along the way. Join groups, connect on Facebook; they will all help to guide you and it can open doors to more help and connections.

 

 

The Devil Knows

The Devil Knows cover

In the early 1960s, residents of Manchester, England were horrified by the sadistic murders of five local youth between the ages of 10 and 17. Known as The Moors Murders, the perpetrators of the crime spree—Myra Hindley and Ian Brady—showed absolutely no remorse for what they had done, nor did they serve up any explanation for why they targeted their particular victims. Upon conviction, the pair received consecutive life sentences rather than execution, the death penalty having been previously abolished. Author David Cooper revisits the scene of Hindley and Brady’s crimes in his new release, The Devil Knows.

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

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Q: Every author’s journey starts in a different place. Did you always know this is what you wanted to do for a career or did inspiration strike during the course of making a living doing something else?

A: I became interested in becoming an author after I interviewed a soap opera star and the interview was published in a national women’s magazine.

Q: Were you a voracious reader as a child?

A: Yes.

Q: What are some of the titles we might have found on the nightstand of your 10-year old self? As a teenager? As an adult?

A: As a teenager, The History of Mr. Polly. As an adult, Misery.

Q: Who are some of the authors you feel have had the greatest influence on your own voice as an author?

A:  Stephen King

Q: What attracted you to the true crime genre?

A:  I remember the Moors murders very well. I was the same age as their last victim at the time.

Q: So tell us what inspired you to pen a book about a pair of such heinous, unrepentant serial killers.

A: I thought that a story about their relationship would make good reading to give readers an idea of what made them what they turned out to be.

Q: How did you structure your research (i.e., interviews, newspaper accounts, etc.)?

A: I was in touch with Ian Brady and I researched internet and newspaper archives.

Q: As the story began to unfold, did you find yourself coming up with theories of your own on what drove Ian and Myra to commit such terrible crimes against children?

A: I got very involved with the story while I was writing it and my personal theory was that their past personal lives drove them to commit these crimes.

Q: How long did it take you from start to finish?

 A: About 15 months.

Q: Do you allow anyone to read your works-in-progress or do you make them wait until you have typed “The End”?

A: I allow one friend to read my works-in-progress.

Q: Like many of today’s authors, you chose to go the route of self-publishing. What governed that decision for you?

 A: One can get a book published much quicker by self-publishing.

Q: What did you learn about this DIY process that you didn’t know when you started?

A: To be honest with you, I didn’t realise it was so easy.

Q: What are you doing to market your work?

A: I am a member of lots of Facebook groups, so I market a lot that way and on other social media.

Q: Does writing energize or exhaust you?

A: I find it adventurous.

Q: What is a typical writing day like for you? And do you write every day?

A: A typical writing day is mainly doing research and yes, I try to write something every day.

Q: As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

A: A dog. I love dogs and have three.

Q: Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

A: Yes, every one. I’m very pleased when I receive good ones, of course. As far as the bad ones, well, I can’t please everybody.

Q: Who is the most famous person you have ever met? Did reality match expectation?

A:  I met Ginger Rogers. I never expected her to be like she was. She was a very nice lady. I didn’t expect a Hollywood legend to appear like a normal person in real life.

Q: Let’s say you could invite three famous people (living or dead) to a small dinner party you were hosting. Who would make the guest list and what would you most like to ask them over the course of the evening?

A: Mother Teresa. I’d ask her why she chose to become a nun.

J.K Rowling.  I’d ask her what the secret is to her success.

Pope John Paul II. I’d ask him what he and Mother Teresa had in common.

Q: What would readers be the most surprised to learn about you?

A: I was a very good friend of a child killer’s wife.

Q: What’s next on your plate?

A: I’m finishing my series about a paranormal investigator, then I’m writing another true crime book about the Cannock Chase murders.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you?

A:  http://davidjcooperauthorblog.wordpress.com

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?

A:  Yes. Thank you for taking the time to interview me.