The Last Rite

The Last Rite

Ten years ago, the love of Daniel’s life disappeared. Then Daniel learns that not only did she commit suicide, but she left behind a daughter he never knew. Taking his estranged offspring home, he gets detoured to the small logging town of Shellington Heights, a town that’s no longer on any map and a population that’s no longer human. They soon find themselves pawns in a supernatural war, with the Apocalypse hinging on one question: How far will a father go to save a daughter he’s never known? Author Chad Robert Morgan introduces us to his pulse-pounding release, The Last Rite.

Interviewer; Christina Hamlett

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Q: Whether it’s in a darkened movie theatre or with our noses tucked in a book on a dark and stormy night, why do you feel our brains are wired to crave the adrenalin of being scared out of our wits?

A: I think it’s a survival technique we evolved from. The adrenalin triggers our fight-or-flight reaction, and we get a huge rush from surviving a challenge. I also think when you watch a scary movie or a horror novel, it’s sort of like practicing. We know we can pause the video or put the book down at any time, something we couldn’t do if it was happening for real. Just like how we strain our muscles when we’re lifting weights, we’re straining or nerves when being scared for entertainment, and in both cases our body gives us a reward with endorphins and the like. Survival is addicting.

Q: Were horror films and/or scary novels part of your entertainment regimen growing up?

A: I grew up before PG-13 was a thing, so I remember seeing things like Gremlins with just my friends and no parents. This was also when VHS became a thing, so while I couldn’t see Nightmare on Elm Street in theaters, no one blinked at me renting a video tape! Eventually I saw all the mainstream videos and started reaching out for more bizarre and fringe videos. I remember seeing Naked Lunch for the first time and trying to understand it; it was way over my head. Might be over my head even today but I love looking for anything that tries something new or experimental.

Q: Scariest movie or book you’ve ever experienced?

A: I remember a friend loaning me a bootleg copy of the original Grudge. I watched the grainy compressed video on my computer monitor, at the time living alone in a studio apartment in Dallas. I saw dead little boys in the corner of my eyes for three days after that.

Playing Silent Hill 2 also terrified me. The way they would build suspense with the radio, how you would hear the static, which would warn you of monsters coming out from the fog before you could see them, was tension-building. This made the game feel more real than a book or movie could, the use of the rumble control so you could feel every hit and feel your heart beat when you’re injured. One part of the game that freaked me out the most, though, was when you find a note laying out on a porch in the town somewhere but it’s addressed to you, the player character. That inspired a scene in the book where a phone with a torn cord rings. Bethany, a child growing up with cell phones and thinking nothing about a disconnected phone ringing, answers. We never hear who’s on the other side, but we hear Bethany confirm her name so whoever it is knows who Bethany is.

The first Paranormal Activity was a master stroke of building tension. A lot of people rag on Paranormal Activity because they really ran the franchise into the ground, but the original was mind-blowing to me. Every time the familiar scene of the camera in the bedroom would fade in and it would say what night it was, you could hear a groan throughout the theater because we knew the weird stuff was coming and each night was worse than the previous one.

Q: Who are some of the masters of the horror genre you especially admire?

A: Stephen King, of course. One of the reasons for his success is his believable characters and how he doesn’t shy away from the dark impulses we all might have. That’s not just the antagonists, but we can see the darker side of the protagonists, too. They’re not knights in shining armor; they’re real people in extraordinary situations.

Q: What got you interested in horror, and are there styles of horror you prefer over others?

A: I was born on Halloween, so every year my birthday and celebrating ghosts and goblins were linked.

I prefer supernatural horror to things like gore-porn (i.e., Hostel). There’s some debate over whether you can do horror without gore, but I think some of the scariest horror movies and books had little to no gore. The Amityville Horror, The Shining, The Grudge – these are movies and books that were terrifying without a lot of bloody violence. I don’t like man’s inhumanity to man; that stops being escapist fantasy and becomes too real. I’ll go with monsters and things that go bump in the night rather than a sociopath with a butcher knife.

Q: Do you write horror exclusively or are there other genres you’ve explored?

A: I write whatever I feel like writing. I look for a good story, wherever it may be. My current project is a raunchy sci-fi parody, which is as different from The Last Rite as you can get. I also have ideas for other horror stories, including sequels and prequals for The Last Rite.

Q: What terrifies you the most in real life?

A: Something happening to my kids. I had a niece who died of SIDS, and I don’t think I shook that. When my daughter was an infant, I was paranoid over it. Any product that was supposed to prevent SIDS, I owned it. Even with my two older kids living on their own and my youngest being 10, it still creeps in on me. Sometimes I’ll lay in bed and the thought will worm its way into my mind, and I’ll get up and check on my youngest son to make sure he’s still breathing.

Q: What was the inspiration behind The Last Rite?

A: The story was inspired by games like Silent Hill, which I love. Ironically, right after we had the idea to do The Last Rite, not only did they announce they were coming out with a Silent Hill movie, but the company I was working for got the contract to do one of the Silent Hill games. I shelved the project for years, not wanting to do both at the same time. After enough time had passed since Silent Hill Homecoming had shipped, I thought it was safe to revisit The Last Rite.

When we were making this as a series, we were trying to reign in the scope of the project, so an isolated and abandoned town kept the cast of characters small. Making an interesting story with a minimal number of characters was challenging, but it forced me to develop the characters and deal with their feelings and motivations.

Q: What are some of the major themes explored in this book?

A:  Fatherhood was an important theme. I wanted to explore how strong paternal instincts would be, how far the main character, Daniel, go to save a daughter he’s never met. The bribe for Daniel to abandon his daughter and it would all be over is dangled in front of him, and I wanted that to feel like a real option. Any parent would automatically say no, but to Daniel this child is a stranger, so I wanted the reader to feel there was a real risk of him accepting the offer.

Q: As you were developing the storyline, what were some of the challenges you encountered?

A: I had to balance Daniel’s desire to save his daughter and the fact they were estranged. I didn’t want Daniel to search for Bethany just because; I had to make it realistic for him to want to find Bethany even though they were strangers. I added a personal tragedy and a sense of duty to Daniel, but I feel I was struggling to explain Daniel’s motivations. I was happy to hear one reviewer mention Daniel’s sense of duty, and I breathed a sigh of relief.

Another issue was, this was the novelization of a bigger project. The dialogue had been recorded five years ago, so those were locked down. There were definitely a few times when I wish I could’ve edited the dialogue, polished or rewritten a line, but the best I could do is cut it.

Q: What motivated you to do your audiobook with a full cast?

A: The Last Rite started as 12 scripts for an animated computer animated horror series. We formed a cast of performers willing to do the series for the promise of being paid if the project were ever to be funded in the future and on royalties if the series was ever completed and sold. Five years later and I was still trying to get the project funded and working on it by myself. I kept trying to prune it down to a smaller piece I could complete, but it kept feeling like I was trying to crawl from San Diego to Seattle. No matter how much progress I made, I wasn’t getting any closer to completing anything. So, I decided to turn the cast recordings to an audio book. I figured at the least, I could get the cast’s hard work out to the public. I really owed it to them.

Q: Tell us about the dedication.

A: As I say, the book came out of a project that was stalled. I had the story, I had the cast recordings, but I couldn’t get the animation done. The biggest step forward was the week we spent recording the dialogue. We flew in the cast (except Edwyn Tiong, who played the Business Suit Man and was from Australia), put them up in a hotel, and went to a local recording studio every day for five days. We rehearsed in the morning and recorded in the afternoon. It was a blast, but it was also a lot of hard work from people who were willing to do it for free and who believed in the project and the story. For five years I worked on this project with that weight on my shoulders, and every day I didn’t complete anything was another day I felt like I was letting them all down. The cast was my motivation to not give up. They had put their faith in me, and I wasn’t going to let them down, not without giving it my best effort at least, but I had to admit what I was doing wasn’t working. I asked myself, how can I get this story out? Then the audiobook idea hit me. So, the book is dedicated to them, the cast of the original animated project The Last Rite, the recordings of which became the audiobook.

Q: Like many of today’s authors, you chose to go the route of self-publishing. What did you learn in the DIY process you didn’t know when you started?

A: Self-publishing also means self-editing and self-marketing. If you think you’re going to throw your book up on Amazon, sit back, and let the Benjamins rain down on you, think again. It takes work to get your book on people’s radar.

Q: What are you doing to market the book?

A: I think one of the more effective tools was the book trailer I made. I posted it on various Facebook groups and got some good traction there. The trailer is very dramatic and eye-catching. I joined Facebook groups that were not only about audiobooks and self-publishing but also that included my target audience. One of the great things about publishing through ACX was they gave me 25 promo codes to hand out to get reviews. In retrospect, I should have handed them out a bit more carefully, but I did get several very good reviews from them.

Q: What would readers be the most surprised to learn about you?

A: I’ve been in the video games industry for 20 years. My first job in the industry was at LucasArts, which doesn’t exist now. Before that, I worked my way through college as a vocational nurse, and before that I was a member of the US Navy.

Q: Best advice to aspiring writers?

A: Don’t write because you want to be the next Stephen King or J. K. Rowling. Write because you have a story to tell. Write because you have a story in you that you need to get out.

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?

A: I have heard back from a few people who have read the book and said they really enjoyed it. It is a real pleasure to know my work was enjoyed by someone else. If you read a book from Amazon or listen to it from Audible and you like it, please rate it and review it! Authors want to please people, so let them know when they have succeeded!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Delilah’s Birthday Surprise

Delilah's Birthday Surprise

Who doesn’t love birthdays? Birthdays mean decorations, friends, cakes, and of course, presents. Some of us have received some pretty incredible gifts throughout our lives, but what about… a hippo? In Delilah’s Birthday Surprise, multi-genre author Danielle Van Alst introduces us to seven-year-old Delilah as she experiences the most memorable birthday of her life.

Interviewer: Sophie Lin

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 Q: How is the process of writing a children’s book different than writing a book of a different genre?

A: I believe good stories from all traditions tend to have certain things in common, including convincing dialogue, strong characters and memorable settings. This goes for children’s stories as well as stories for adults, although there are some important differences. Stories for adults, for example, aren’t usually illustrated. And, depending on the age of the children you are writing for, there are elements of violence and sexuality you’ll want to leave out or handle with great caution. I like to keep children’s books lighthearted, fun, and entertaining all while sending a message.

Q: What inspired you to write this book?

A: I grew up as an only child and had difficulty relating to people my own age. Admittingly, being an only child can get lonely at times. I thought how fun it would be to create a character who is an only child in a nontraditional household and gets a “buddy” for a birthday present. That friend just happens to be a hippopotamus from her eccentric grandmother. I wanted Delilah to be able to feel unique and special, when all she ever felt was “different or weird.” I wanted to depict a situation that may not be seen as “typical” in a fun way.

Q: How often do you write poetry?

A: I write poetry every day, even if it’s just something small like a haiku. I have an Instagram account that I use as a poetry diary. It’s a great way to express myself while combining my love of poetry and graphic design. You can check it out @dvanalstwriter.

 Q: What is your favourite genre to write and why?

A: That’s a tough question. That’s like asking me to pick a favorite child! I actually really enjoy challenging myself and experimenting across genres. I enjoy writing mystery, horror, historical fiction, poetry, kid’s lit, and tragedy. I suppose it would be easier for me to name the genres I tend to avoid and that would be sci-fi, fantasy, and erotica.

 Q: How would you describe your experience working with an illustrator?

A: I have worked with three different illustrators on three different book projects and they have all been a little different. For A World of Imagination and Delilah’s Birthday Surprise, I was not in direct contact with the illustrator. Instead, I sent a detailed storyboard to the publisher explaining in-depth exactly what I wanted each illustration to look like. The descriptions had to be exact all the way down to the shoelaces on Delilah’s sneakers and the decorations on the wall in her bedroom. The publisher would then send my storyboard over to the illustrator where they would draw it, send it back to the publisher, then the publisher would send it to me for approval or a redo.

For my upcoming book, Little Winnie Witch Goes to Flight School, I was able to work with a freelance illustrator one-on-one and it was a great experience collaborating on this project. I told her my vision and how I wanted each picture to look and she delivered with flying colors!

Q: What first ignited your passion for writing?

A: I have been writing since the day I could make scribbles on paper with a crayon. When I was really little I wanted to be a newspaper woman and write all the stories that were going on around me because I was so fascinated with other people’s lives. I was always watching and observing the world around me and making up stories about what I saw. I started a little newspaper in elementary school complete with a comics section and was certain that was what I wanted to do. I loved retreating into my imagination and making up stories that I could escape into. I guess I was just enamored with the world of pretend and make believe because it was so much more fun than reality! From there I started exploring different types of writing and got into poetry, short story writing, essays, flash fiction, and novels. I wanted to do it all!

 Q: How would you describe your publishing experience?

A: It has been both challenging and rewarding. I have worked with several different publishers and have learned a lot along the way. It’s a long process from idea to the completed book readers hold in their hands and the road is often bumpy and stressful. There is a great deal of rewriting, correcting, technical error repair, formatting, marketing, editing, graphic design, and promoting involved with the release of a single book. The result is something you created that everyone can enjoy!

Q: Was there any particular reason you chose a pet hippo as Delilah’s birthday present?

A: I thought a hippo was a unique and quirky pet. I have a lot of adventures planned for Delilah and Louise as this is book one in a series and a hippo seemed like a perfect fit for all the trouble they are going to get into!

Q: What is your favourite birthday present that you’re received?

A: Honestly, it’s the gift of love and quality time. As a kid, I never had birthday parties or anything like that but, as an adult, a very beloved friend of mine began celebrating my birthday with me. It’s so wonderful to just be together and feel loved and special on my day. There is nothing better than just relaxing and being with people you care about.

Q: What future projects of yours should we be looking out for?

A: I have a ton of projects in the works! I have another children’s book coming out in mid-September.  I also have another historical fiction novel surrounding the North Berwick Witch Trials that is very near completion. It’s a story that has taken me years to write due to the extensive amount of research that needed to be done. I’m hoping to see that released sometime next year. Stay tuned!

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to add?

A: I just want to thank all my readers. Without you, none of this would be possible!

 

Bright Pink Ink

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“Poetry,” wrote John Keats, “should surprise by a fine excess and not by singularity. It should strike the reader as a wording of his own highest thoughts and appear almost a remembrance.” In her new collection of poetry, Bright Pink Ink, Laura DiNovis Berry embraces this very idea of connectivity and relatability by penning poetic reflections that celebrate the pitfalls and joys of simply being alive through odes to rugby, ruminations on being a military spouse and falling in love.

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

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Q: Tell us about your journey as a writer and when you first knew this was what you wanted to do for a living.

A: I think I truly invested my time into writing once I ran out of new books to read in the little library of the elementary school I attended. I later went to West Chester University of Pennsylvania as an English Composition major, but it was only in my junior year that I rediscovered my adoration of poetry.

Q: Are there any other writers in your family?

A: Yes! My oldest sister, Christine Leonard, is also a published writer; she wrote an adorable children’s book, “Zebra Beeba,” a few years ago and is now working on a suspenseful Young Adult piece.

Q: Do you remember the first thing you ever had published?

A: If I remember correctly it was a poem I wrote when I was about eight years old or so. It was called “Sleepy Head” and encouraged laziness to the tenth degree. I think it was published in a collection called Young Poets of America – something to that effect anyway.

Q: Who are some of the authors and poets that had an influence on your writing style and your view of the world?

A: When I was young, the fantasy greats J.K. Rowling, C.S. Lewis and Tolkien, held me in their thrall. Once I reached high school, John Updike was one the first writers who truly impacted how I approached my own work. His romanticism of the mundane struck a chord with me.

Q: Teachers often discourage poetry as a viable avenue for building a writing career. Agree or disagree?

A: It is extremely hard to make a living from simply producing a book of poetry. In addition to crafting poetry, I write book reviews which not only act as a form of income but serve as a platform for modern poets struggling to bring their work to the public’s attention.

Q: Did you choose poetry or did poetry choose you?

A: Poetry chose me. I only began writing verse when I felt teenage hormones first sink their hooks into me. In an attempt to translate how I was feeling, I started writing poetry. It served as a conduit for emotions I didn’t understand or quite knew how to express.

Q: Favorite poem by a famous author?

A: “Marriage Year 43” by Betsey Cullen. Cullen isn’t famous yet but she should be. Her chapbook, Our Place in Line, is an utter joy to read.

Q: What is it about this form of expression that particularly resonates with you?

A: It is fluid. Poetry does not want to become contained, and if you, the poet, find yourself trapped mentally then no good poetry can come of your efforts. Writing a good poem is like finding a four leaf clover. The harder you look, the harder it is to find.

Q: Describe what a typical writing day is like for you.

A: I’ll be honest – I don’t have a set writing schedule or a typical formula I follow; however, I have found my most productive writing sessions occur while I am flying. There is nothing else to do except sit and write and so, I sit and I write.

Q: Do you let anyone read your works in progress or do you make them wait until you’re finished?

A: I am a big believer in letting people view my work before I bring it to its completion. Different eyes can find treasures in a piece that the original poet couldn’t even have dreamed existed!

Q: You chose self-publishing rather than going the traditional route. What did you learn from the DIY experience that you didn’t know when you started?

A: I learned how to create a book cover which resulted in a fun (at times frustrating) little series of experiments!

Q: What are you doing to promote your work?

A: I am seeking out anyone willing to talk to me and was very happy to see my local library purchased a copy of my book! I’ve also sent free copies to some souls willing to read and review my work.

Q: Best advice to aspiring poets?

A: First, edit. Next, allow a friendly, but discerning, editor to survey your piece. Then edit and edit again.

Q: What’s next on your plate?

A:  I have two works in progress currently. One is a memoir about achieving my lifelong dream of owning a dog, and the second is a poetry collection dedicated to those fascinating animals.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you?

A: I am on twitter @rightoffthevine and my book reviews can be read on Vocal.Media at https://vocal.media/authors/laura-dinovis-berry