Twelve Years in the Grave

Soleilmavis book cover

Have you ever caught yourself saying, “I must be losing my mind”? Usually spoken in reference to misplaced car keys, forgotten appointments, or déjà vu moments, it’s a scenario of temporary confusion…and one that is nowhere near the fear level associated with external forces seeking to gain control of your most private thoughts. For author Soleilmavis Liu, the chilling premise of powerlessness is not the stuff of cinematic science fiction but, rather, the real-life horror of discovering your own government is covertly employing mind manipulation technologies. Liu shares what prompted her to expose the truth in Twelve Years In The Grave – Mind Control With Electromagnetic Spectrums, The Invisible Modern Concentration Camp.

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

**********

Q: Tell us a little about your upbringing, your family, and what you dreamed about becoming when you were a young girl.

A: I am a Chinese citizen, born and raised in China in a rural area which had a simple and vanilla environment. My parents came from farmers’ families. My mother graduated in a polytechnic school, and my father had middle school education. They were rare people who had some education in rural areas at that time. I studied in one of the top primary schools of China; I entered one of the top secondary schools of Shandong Province, which was famous with its high educational standards in China. I liked to read history books since I was very young. My friends regarded me as a ‘bookworm’! My teachers often selected my essays as the model essays at primary and middle school.

When I was a young girl, I dreamed to travel all over the world, study hard, work hard, learn different cultures and meet different people. I entered a university at age 17. After university, I worked in the easternmost County of China; then I went abroad to work. When I had earned and saved enough money, I applied to a university to study a Master’s Degree in Australia.

Q: Who do you believe had the most influence on shaping your outlook about life?

A: Although my father came from a farmer’s family in a rural area in China, he paid much attention to the world development. He had many books which were written by foreigners and he also ordered the newspaper of “Reference News” which has been published by Xinhua News Agency since the 1960s. It was the only official channel for the Chinese public to have a glimpse of the outside world. As the Chinese government’s official news agency, Xinhua carefully selects articles from the world’s major news agencies and news journals and translates them into Chinese. These books and the newspaper opened my eyes to the world, instead of focusing only on China and matters around my area.

Q: What was your academic major when you applied to a university in Australia?

A: Master of Business Information Technologies (MBI)

Q: When did you first become aware of mind control technologies?

A: December 2001

Q: For readers who aren’t familiar with remote voice-to-skull and electromagnetic mind control technologies, why was the government doing this?

A: I did an anonymous Survey for Mind Control Victims all over the world. By the end of 2009, 296 victims including 130 Females and 166 Males filled out the questionnaires. The possible reasons victims believed they became a target were:

(1) Government Secret Human Experiments or Scientists Performing Secret Human Experiments supported by Government (58.11%);

(2) Scientists Performing Secret Human Experiments (36.82%);

(3) Government Secret War (33.45%);

(4) Secret Political persecution (32.77%);

(5) Terrorist violence (22.97%);

(6) Misuse of weapons by government corruption (45.27%).

Q: What time period are we talking about and, to your knowledge, is this still going on?

A: The time period is from December 2001 until today, and it is still going on.

Q: Why do you believe you were chosen?

A: As a legitimate civilian, I was never involved in any illegal organization and I never did anything unlawful. The torturers couldn’t give a legitimate reason for harassing and torturing me with high technologies. I believe that they chose me as a test subject.

Q: Were you able to talk to anyone about what you were experiencing? If so, what was their reaction?

A: As a previous IT supervisor, I understood that computers and the Internet were the most important tools to acquire new knowledge, gain new information and meet expert people. Since I believed that I was attacked by high electromagnetic spectrums technologies, I talked to people through the Internet and searched information; I found many people who understood my sufferings, and I have collected a lot of information about voice-to-skull and electromagnetic mind control technologies. According to a survey, about 15% believe mind control technologies and their abuse and torture.

Q: What was the geographic reach? In other words, couldn’t you have left the region and gone somewhere else to escape?

A: I was first attacked in Australia in December 2001 by remote voice-to-skull and electromagnetic mind control technologies. During April 2002 to April 2003, I traveled to Hong Kong, Thailand, South China, New Zealand, but could not get rid of the remote harassment and torture. Since April 2003 until today, I live in China and still suffer the horrible harassment and torture. Voice-to-skull and electromagnetic mind control technologies can attack an individual through satellites or other high technologies.

Q: What part did religious faith play in helping you to endure this level of mind torture?

A: My religious faith played the most important part in helping me to endure this level of mind torture. God was the light in the dark that lightened my heart; He was the light of freedom shining upon me. This light would point the way to victory.

Q: What inspired you to write your book?

A: Many victims who have been working hard to expose such horrible abuse and torture of electromagnetic mind control technologies had greatly encouraged me to work hard to write this book which I believe it would be a help for them seeking justice and fighting such crimes. I believe it will appeal to people who are concerned about human rights, torture, and justice; people who are concerned about abuse and torture with voice-to-skull, mind control technologies, non-lethal weapons, and electromagnetic spectrums weapons, and people who wish to know how God helps those in darkness.

Q: Had you done any writing prior to this?

A: I had published two articles in academic journals.

Soleilmavis’ case summary on mind control torture and abuse, Academic Journals, Journal of Law and Conflict Resolution Vol. 4(2), pp. 27-30, February 12, 2012

The Ends of the Earth, Nature and Science 2011; 9(5):132-139]. (ISSN: 1545-0740). May 2011

 

Q: How long did it take you to write your book?

A: This book is my real stories of the past 12 years. I kept diaries the whole time and finally made these diaries into a book between 2011 and 2013.

Q: Did you have any help with it?

A: Curtis Baker in USA, John Finch, human rights activist in Australia, Cheryl Twyford in USA, and Cheryl Locke in Canada helped me edit the book.

Q: Why did you decide to self-publish this title?

A: Mind control technologies and their abuse and torture are still covered by governments, and the mainstream public does not believe it. No publishing company was willing to talk to a new writer who was writing a strange topic for them.

Q: What do you feel is your book’s strongest takeaway value for readers?

A: Mankind never stops the pace of seeking social equity and justice. Human Rights is one of the most important causes.  This book makes a little contribution to the cause of social equity, justice and human rights. It would encourage those who endure hardness and live in the darkness to never stop persevering with courage, hope, and faith.

Q: What inspires you?

A: God and the Bible inspire me, making me strong and giving me faith in exposing secret crimes and seeking justice on the Earth.

Q: What would readers be the most surprised to learn about you?

A: Always regarding me as a shy and reticent woman, who was even timid and always tried to keep out of trouble. People who used to know me well never thought that I would become an activist and stand up to fight against one of the 21st century’s greatest violations of human rights which is the proliferation of electromagnetic mind control technologies and their accompanying abuse and torture. Readers will also find in my book that it is God who has been encouraging me and making me a brave soldier to fight for justice and human rights.

Q: What are you working on now?

A: I am working on the Worldwide campaign to stop the abuse and torture of the following: directed energy weapons, neurological weapons, mind control weapons, body and brain manipulation weapons, psychtronic weapons, space weapons, non-lethal weapons, and any other unacknowledged or as yet undeveloped means of inflicting death or injury on, or damaging or destroying, a person (or the biological life, bodily health, mental health, or physical and economic well-being of a person) through the use of land-based, sea-based, or space-based systems for the purpose of information war, mood management, or mind control of target populations.

I am also working on another book: An Ordinary Man’s Vicissitudes of Life, which records the real history through an ordinary man’s life in a rural area of Shandong Peninsula from 1932-2000.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you and your book?

A: Readers can go to http://peacepink.ning.com to learn more about me. The book can be read at: http://www.lulu.com/shop/soleilmavis-liu/twelve-years-in-the-grave-mind-control-with-electromagnetic-spectrums-the-invisible-modern-concentration-camp/ebook/product-21226200.html

Advertisements

Dancing in the Heart of the Dragon: A Memoir of China

Dancing Dragon

“Twenty years from now,” wrote Mark Twain, “you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

Ramona McKean, author of Dancing in the Heart of the Dragon: A Memoir of China, did exactly that when she heeded the message of an inner voice that suggested her life’s calling might be found thousands of miles from her Canadian home. It’s a must-read for women over 40 who want to be inspired, to find their purpose and, ultimately, to make a difference.

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

**********

Q: In 2004, you fulfilled a longstanding dream of living and working abroad. Why did you happen to choose China?

A: In the midst of despair in early 2004, I knew I needed to do something radically different with my life but didn’t know what. That changed the day I heard an inner voice tell me straight out I was going to China. That’s how I happened to choose China. I trusted the voice and had a feeling China would play a very significant role in my life.

Q: How much did you know about your destination prior to going there?

I was moderately up-to-date with current events and moderately knowledgeable with the basics of 20th Century Chinese history. Before leaving Canada I made a point of researching Harbin, the northern city where I’d be teaching. I also talked to many people who’d been to China. Of course, no amount of book learning and conversing could adequately measure up to my experiencing China first hand.

Q: What were your initial impressions of the country in 2004 and of its people when you first arrived?

A: Fascinating and exciting! The energy was different; I could almost hear the crackling of aliveness combined with a sense of urgency. Demolition and construction seemed simultaneous, they happened so quickly. A colleague quipped: “What’s the national bird of China?” Answer: “The crane.” Cranes outlined the skyline whichever way I looked.

The people I encountered were usually reserved until I smiled. I often got huge smiles back. Sometimes people were curious about my nationality. Occasionally, when they learned “Canadian,” they’d bow and say “Bai Qiu En” (sounds a bit like bye-chee’yo-enn). It means Bethune. I felt deeply touched. Dr. Norman Bethune was a Canadian doctor who helped the Chinese during war time. All middle school students read the essay Mao wrote about the “selfless Canadian hero.”

I worked at the Harbin University of Science and Technology, teaching English to first year students. I quickly discovered they were far less sophisticated than my senior high school students in Canada. Their prompt cleaning of the blackboards at the end of class took me off guard. It was something they just did. Right from the start, I also noticed respect, appreciation and good-naturedness. They were a lot of fun.

Too many smokers! At my university, smoke billowed from offices into the hallway, taking me back to previous times in Canada. Too many drivers were bold and audacious, and almost nobody used seatbelts. (Often there were no seatbelts.) As a pedestrian, I had to be extra mindful.

The Chinese food was amazing and inexpensive. Western fast food joints—MacDonalds, Pizza Hut and KFC—charged much higher prices. I went into those establishments for one reason only: their Western toilets, hot water and soap. I still needed my own tissue. In restaurants and everywhere else in China, tipping was illegal.

These are just a few initial impressions. My prequel will be full of my impressions and experiences. Please bear in mind that China is a rapidly developing country. What I’ve said above may be different now.

Q: What was the hardest – and, conversely, the easiest – thing to adjust to in your conscious decision to make a major lifestyle change?

A: The hardest thing before leaving Canada was managing my emotions. I felt thoroughly overwhelmed and also extremely excited with such a radical choice. The easiest part was my complete and utter knowing that going to China was singularly the right thing for me to do.

Once in China, the hardest part of my adjustment was missing my grown-up kids intensely. And Christmas? I could not have predicted how desolate I’d feel being so far from home. The easiest thing was falling in love with China. It happened so naturally that it took about two months for me to clue in. Like the experience of falling in love with a person, my feelings were so deep they often hurt. Being in a serious car accident and having to leave only added to the depth and complexity of my feelings. John Fraser in The Chinese, Portrait of a People expressed exactly how I felt with leaving: “Like many foreigners who went to China and have known the Chinese, a part of me feels in permanent exile.”

Q: You indicate in the opening pages that sometimes an invisible hand directs the course of one’s life.  Do you believe the major events in our personal journeys are predestined or are we still mostly creatures of free will?

A: I lay many long hours in a Canadian hospital bed contemplating that difficult question. I asked myself: “Was falling in love with China and almost dying there a matter of fate, predestination or free will?” My thoughts are not easy to express but I’ll try my best.

First I’ll mention my way of defining the terms. As you can see, I’m throwing fate into the mix. Fate is neutral and impersonal and implies events that are meant to happen. Predestination is used synonymously by some people. To me it differs in that it suggests a plan, not neutral, that’s devised by another, greater power. (That awesome, mysterious force is not male, but I shall call it God.)  Humans have no control with either fate or predestination.

Free will is the opposite, allowing humans the ability to make conscious choices. The key word to note is “conscious.” People can only exercise free will to the extent that they’re conscious. For instance, in my life I’ve too often made choices dictated by unconscious dynamics; that is, by unhealed emotional wounds and habitual responses. To be truly “free,” my will must involve intelligent self-reflection. For the major events, my will must also be accompanied by courage and strength. I’ve found that the more courageous I can be, the stronger I become. Strength I never knew possible comes to me from God.

You asked me if I thought predestination or free will characterized the lives of humans. I have a hard time with the idea of predestination. Maybe the issue is one of consciousness, i.e., the conscious awareness that we are all part of the greater power, God; that in essence, we’re all one. I believe the more we each heal our personal pasts (including what’s been passed down through our families), the freer we are to determine our own direction. I believe that when God sees us constructively use whatever awful stuff life throws our way, “it” says: “Here is one to enter into co-creative partnership with me. Hooray!” When we maintain an open and humble attitude, mindfully attuned with God, a new direction is created together. It’s like a delicate, dynamic dance with the Divine to co-create a destiny.

Especially after the accident, I had an uncanny feeling that China was part of my destiny.  Do you remember I said a voice took me to China? When I was trapped in wreckage I heard the voice again. It used the first person and in a calm, matter of fact way said: “I don’t know what this is all about but I do know it’s part of a bigger picture and it’s a good picture and it involves me and China.” I’m grateful that I somehow had the presence of mind to notice and remember.

Q: According to Amy Tan in Opposite of Fate, a Book of Musings, the best stories often come from the worst experiences. As a stranger in a strange land, you certainly endured one of the worst experiences imaginable – a head-on-collision that nearly proved fatal. Tell us about this nightmare experience and what gave you the strength to survive it.

A: It was Spring Festival time (aka Chinese New Year). A bilingual Chinese friend and I were travelling in a poor rural area in the south, far from where I taught in the north. I realized our driver was sleepy when I saw a bus headed straight at us. We were on the wrong side of the road. The drivers’ trying to avoid each other didn’t work. We collided head-on at a slight angle. In no time I found myself pinned between the crushed front of the van and the right passenger door. Given I had no seatbelt, it’s miraculous I didn’t go through the windshield. My friend, seated behind me, was injured too. We helplessly watched our driver die. It took quite a while for rescuers (private citizens) to show up. The events that followed were unusual and some downright bizarre; I have included them all in my book. My friend’s father, cousin and sister slept on a hospital floor for three nights to take care of me until a 26 year old colleague flew 2200 km from Harbin. He got me released from the hospital and saw me safely back to Canada.

In Canada, I found out the true extent of my injuries: 7 ribs broken, both legs broken and right knee crushed. How I survived crude rescue, two questionable Chinese hospitals and two flights home is beyond me, especially considering my right lung lining was punctured too.

What gave me the strength to survive? Shock in the form of denial helped. I was calm, trusting and present; it didn’t occur to me I might die. The voice helped. It told me goodness was in the works and I’d be able to derive purpose from awfulness. Most of all, it was the love of my Chinese friends and students who with all their hearts told me: Da nan bu si, bi you hou fu, “If a big bad event doesn’t kill you, then you are guaranteed happiness and extraordinary good fortune.” Their love and faith sustained me.

Q. It sounds like the voice provided you with an epiphany. Tell us about how you derived “purpose from awfulness” and in what ways you feel you’re making a difference.

A: “I don’t know what this is all about but I do know it’s part of a bigger picture and it’s a good picture and it involves me and China.”

The voice did not explicitly tell me what my purpose was. Rather, it opened me up to a new world of possibility. I knew it would involve writing. China had made a profound impression on me, both the culture and the people. I wanted to build a narrative bridge of understanding between us and China. That bridge is now built, Dancing in the Heart of the Dragon.

Something that really concerns me is how our Western media deliberately creates fear and misperception about China. As far as I’m concerned, an “us vs. them” mentality is plain bad news. China’s a big country developing fast. What wisdom is there in our casting them as the “enemy”?  The Chinese are people, just like us. Why not choose to get to know them better? The mutual benefits would be enormous!

It’s time for a more balanced and fair picture to be painted. Dancing in the Heart of the Dragon does this and also gives readers plenty to self-reflect upon. It’s a story told honestly from my heart to readers’ hearts.

Just imagine all our children and grandchildren inheriting a more friendship based world! That’s what I stand for, and that’s how I am making a difference.

Q: You mention using your story as a bridge between cultures. Is the bridge on your cover meant to be symbolic of this? Tell us about your book’s striking cover and how you chose your title.

A: Yes, I intend the bridge as a symbol linking East and West. The dragon, which happens to be the most important creature in Chinese folklore, is the national symbol of China. The phoenix is a creature thought to bring goodness. In most Chinese legends the phoenix does not burn like its Western counterpart. In my cover design, the phoenix represents me, finally able to rise from the flames of physical and emotional trauma. In terms of the physical, I required three surgeries and well over a year of rehab to walk normally. As for emotional trauma, I was not able to experience release until the day I launched this book, February 10, 2013, eight years to the day after the accident.

As regards the title, I did not choose it. It’s more apt to say it chose me. I wanted something “perfect” that included the words “dragon” and “dancing.” Try as I might, I couldn’t think of it. Then one afternoon the words “Dancing in the Heart of the Dragon” flashed into my head. I almost fell over in awe. A little later that same day while shopping, I pulled a red top from a clothes rack and was amazed to see its front sequined with a Chinese dragon. It was like God saying: “My dear, I am so with you.”  I leave it to readers to experience how perfectly Dancing in the Heart of the Dragon fits my story.

Q: If the chance presented itself to go back to the country that nearly killed you, would you take it?

A: The chance did not “present itself”; I actually made it happen. I returned to China in 2008 to study Mandarin at a university. I had to overcome a lot of fear to do that. I expect I’ll return yet again when my book is available in China.

Q: Tell us about the development of Dancing in the Heart of the Dragon, a Memoir of China and the takeaway value you believe it holds for your readership.

A: The dream to write about China started to germinate the day a voice told me I was going to China (early 2004 in Canada). I knew I was in for dramatic change and wanted to capture it. I made a point of writing emails and journals full to the brim with details. That writing provided the treasure trove I drew from later.

For a long time after the accident I wanted to write for publication but couldn’t. Doing so would mean facing trauma. It wasn’t until joining a writers group in early 2010 that I was able to start. I wrote more than half a book, none of which deals with the time period covered in Dancing in the Heart of the Dragon. (That material shall be in my prequel.)

In 2012 I took coaching sessions with the woman who was to become my publisher, Julie Salisbury (Influence Publishing). She told me I had to start all over again, with the accident. (Gulp, now or never!) I decided to use actual journal entries, conversations, email correspondence, photographs, songs and dream work. I also decided to move back and forth in time and tell my story from a hospital bed. In that way it’s like The English Patient.

Dancing in the Heart of the Dragon is an engaging story. I know because I’ve been accused of keeping people up all night. The writing has a quality of immediacy, such that readers feel they’re right there with me—whether it’s lying on the sub-tropical sands of the “Island of Pianos” or being freed from wreckage with crowbars and carried up and down flights of stairs on a narrow board.

And of course, there is learning about the real China, in a book written by a Westerner who loves and respects the people of China.

Q: How did you go about finding a publisher?

A: I did not try to find a publisher. I saw Julie for coaching before she even owned a publishing company. She was moved and inspired by my story. From there everything flowed, just like it was meant to be.

Q: What do you know now about the publishing business that you didn’t know when you started?

A: The industry is in a process of redefining itself. I knew this when I started but didn’t know just how rapid the changes were. Writers must work diligently on their own promotion. Utilizing the Internet is critical, a task daunting for many. It can also be daunting to know just who to hire. Money plus much time, energy and ingenuity seem to be necessary to meet with success.

Q: Have you been influenced by Chinese literature you have read? If so, in what ways?

A: My sensibilities have been influenced the most by the I Ching, an ancient book woven together with Taoist and Confucian teachings. It has helped me enormously, ever since I encountered it in the late 1980’s.

Twentieth century writers particularly influencing me include: Anchee Min (Red Azalea), Jung Chang (Wild Swans), Xin Ran (The Good Women of China), Amy Tan (Kitchen God’s Wife), Adeline Yen Mah (Watching the Tree), Lisa See (Snow Flower and the Secret Fan), Han Suyin (A Mortal Flower) and Jan Wong (Red China Blues). These writers have all provided me with much insight into the lives of Chinese people, especially their own and other women’s. They’ve educated my mind and heart and helped me to understand China’s culture and way of viewing the world.

Q: In light of current global tensions, do you believe a true understanding between Chinese and Westerners will ever come about? If so, what concessions and compromises would be necessary from both sides? 

A: A true understanding between Chinese and Westerners will take effort. I can’t know if it will come about but it’s my dream. I’m willing to do what I can to promote that possibility. For one, we need to recognize that we’re fed a lot of propaganda about China as they are about us. It’s important not to believe everything we hear and read, especially from politicians and mainstream media. They have their agendas which include nothing about heart-level understanding.

Westerners have to stop finger pointing. It does no one any good. China has a lot of problems. Any country with such a huge population developing so fast would have problems. Let’s develop compassion and a desire to build rather than destroy with our attitudes.

We ALL, everywhere, need to get over ourselves and get educated about each other—each other’s culture and different ways of perceiving the world. We need to see our common ground. This education does not have to be unpleasant at all. In fact, it can be fun.  In the West, a great way to start experiencing Chinese culture is through literature, movies, music and food. Have conversations with Chinese people we meet. People in China: Don’t be shy to have conversations with the foreigners in your midst. If language is an issue, smile, be friendly and courteous. Chances are others will respond similarly. Curiosity can be a wonderful attribute. Travel is also awesome. Regular people, perhaps more than politicians, need to lead the way in understanding.  And everyone, please remember: People are not their governments and people everywhere are individually unique. No one is a stereotype.

Q: As of this writing, your book is being considered by three book awards committees. Whether you are short-listed or not, how might being nominated help promote your purpose? 

A: Award nominations and actual awards draw much attention to a book and increase the credibility of the writer. Many readers have already told me how moved and inspired they felt by Dancing in the Heart of the Dragon, a Memoir of China. When people feel moved and inspired, their hearts and minds open up at least a little more than before. True understanding is then more possible.

Q: What’s next on your plate?

A: Within a year I’d like to have my book translated into Chinese and on the market in Asia. I also want to write my prequel.

Q: Anything else you’d like readers to know?

A: The Dalai Lama said that Western women will save the world—women because of their ability to nurture and respond with their hearts; Western because of their many hard won victories that women elsewhere have yet to experience. I believe it’s not only women who’ll serve as the world’s capable and compassionate “rescuers,” but also men who are not ashamed to own and honour their own gentler qualities.

Though my story may not “save the world,” I recognize its unique potential to promote understanding between us in the West and people in China. It’s a human heart to human heart understanding, the kind that leads to friendliness and good-will. My story reveals how communicating and opening to each other’s goodness can benefit us all.

In closing, I would like to invite people to visit my website, read the first few pages of my book (“Preview”) and listen to some of the music (“Soundtrack”) that helped me fall in love with a nation. http://ramonamckean.com Until then, “Xin xiang shi cheng”: May the dreams of your heart come true.