Shadows of the Keeper

KBrown

Coffee’s her vice, historical romances her weakness, and marriage to her boss’s son is but a month away – normal, everyday stuff, for a normal, everyday Texan gal. Except there’s hardly anything ‘normal’ about Emily Garrison. Little does Emily know, she’s the long awaited High Queen of a kingdom in a parallel universe . . . and the soul mate to Hades’ son, Prince Dezenial of the Lumynari. To start the new year, we’re chatting with Karey Brown, author of Shadows of the Keeper.

Interviewer: Christy Campbell

**********

Aside from general plot, our characters are at the head of the class, pulling the reader into the story. What was the biggest challenge of developing your main characters?

Writing two different books until it felt right—until the main characters were in their correct roles. For example, in the first telling, I have Emily and Broc getting married; having them basically picking up where they left off 3,600 years earlier. Prince Dezenial was going to be the ‘bad guy’.

This kept me up for too many nights. When I changed the entire story, THIS time, the too-many-nights-up was because I couldn’t stop writing! It was as if I couldn’t type fast enough, their story flashing in my mind like a movie. The biggest challenge was convincing myself that it was okay to let go of the first story version, and rewrite all of it, no matter how long the blasted thing took!

In deciding on your characters’ backgrounds, how did you come up with your characters’ names?

Emily has been with me for years and years. Her story has always just kind of been there—a woman who is reincarnated over the ages, having lived several lives. I also subscribe to the whole soul mate thing—when we come around a corner, see someone, and have that weird déjà vu moment, is it really that we’ve seen that person before, or is that our soul instantly recognizes their soul as having been meaningful to us in a previous life? What if the love was so profound, no matter how many lifetimes they’re born into, they keep finding each other? Now consider, what if one of them was immortal? How would he/she know that the other existed again? Broc has been with me about as long as Emily, and though I tried to have them be the two ‘connected’ souls, it never felt right. After writing the first version, I realized why: they were together in a previous life, but it was never meant to be, though it will scar Broc for a very long time, and leave Emily with an anger towards him that she doesn’t understand—not at first.

Dezenial’s name, however, was a bloody nightmare to come up with. Nothing fit his persona, so, for a long time, I used XXX as a placeholder. A name generator finally helped, and taking the part of one name and adding it to another, I came up with Dezenial. It was so perfect, and so weird how the two parts connected, I stared at the monitor for a long time, wondering if I was tapping into some otherworldly event, or was I really making this story up?

Reignsfeugh and Inzyr’s names took playing with sounds and spelling. For the rest of the cast—and there are many—I hunted through Celtic/Gaelic names and their meanings. Again, they had to fit the character.

Do you have a favorite character?

I like the complication of Inzyr. The assassin’s story begs to be told, but it isn’t quite the right time yet. I keep trying to set him up with a love interest, but have had to accept there existed only one true love for him—something never suffered by Shadow Masters. They’re not interested in the emotional commitment; never succumb to the weakness.

Amidst the huge birth of a young adult craze, the competition is tough. What made you choose this particular genre?

As much as I LOVED Judy Bloom’s storytelling when I was a kid, I don’t possess the knack for writing YA. Historical romances, mythology, and paranormal grabbed hold of me, and never let go. I create fairytales, mythologies, languages, realms, and beings. Tossed into this mix are everyday normal people finding themselves connected to these otherwise unknown realms/parallel universes, and how their lives change; how they cope with discovering mythology/fantasy is fact.

Was there a particular scene that was the most difficult for you to write?

When Peter assaults Emily. It forced me to relive a personal experience involving violence. There aren’t exactly shelters for battered women in the year 1214 A.D. Also, when we suffer something so overwhelming, some of us are lucky enough to have a ‘hero’ rescue us, put us back on our feet, and send us back into the world of the living. I wanted this for Emily, but I didn’t want the rescue to be her ‘happily-ever-after’. The scene and the outcome needed to be both realistic, and show relationship-complication, regardless how much one person loves another. The answer isn’t always obvious to the two people caught up in a blossoming fondness.

Sometimes, things are running along smoothly and suddenly we might step back and re-think an entire chapter, even an ending. What there an unexpected decision you made about the plot?

There’s a particular plot that left me crying and incredibly sad for so many days, I realized I had to do SOMETHING to free myself of this funk. That’s when I realized said plot needed to end differently—and, WOW, did it change the entire story!! It was also a way to avoid seeking professional help—which would have probably resulted in my having been committed, since this sorrow was for an imaginary character. I can just see it now, sobbing, ‘But, he died…as in, d-e-a-d!’ *sob, sob, sob* Oh yeah, straightjackets would have been my permanent attire. Not a good look.

What atmosphere do you find to be the most productive, yet relaxing to keep those pages going?

A small dining room converted into an office and closed off from the rest of the house with an odd entry off the kitchen creates my ‘secret’ room. In here, I’m surrounded by hundreds of books lining dark wood bookcases. Tapestries depicting medieval scenes hang above my L-shaped desk, and covering the floor are rugs I acquired in Turkey. Low-lit lamps complete the Old World ambiance, while, in the background, BrunuhVille plays on the Bose.

What surprised you the most about the novel writing process along with self-publishing?

How much ‘self-published’ is such a dirty word. It’s like we’re the pariahs of the publishing/writing world. If our work isn’t published by a ‘real’ publisher, somehow, we’re hacks. You won’t find silicone between my pages. No fake ta-tas here. I DID submit my manuscript to several agents. And, bless their hearts, even though they rejected Shadows of the Keeper, they still took the time to write a quick sentence or two, on their form letters, that my writing was very good, I excelled at storytelling, but the overall story just wasn’t for them, or didn’t quite fit what they were looking for—to keep writing/submitting. Some even offered a reference to another agent that they thought might be interested in my type of work. When an agent/editor takes time from their crazy schedule, and the thousands of manuscripts being submitted, to write a personal blurb of encouragement, that’s HUGE! I was not, however, willing for Shadows to sit somewhere and collect dust. I just had this feeling about this particular story—that it had to be told.

Is there an author, past or present, who served as your inspiration?

Laurie McBain, who wrote Moonstruck Madness (1977), was my first historical romance. I began reading historicals with the same appetite I now have for cheesecake—get your eyes off my hips. Just because I don’t LOOK like a starving artist doesn’t mean I’m not hungry. Last Christmas, I discovered a hardcover copy of Moonstruck Madness. It now rests on my ‘treasures’ shelf.

What is the best piece of advice you’ve taken to heart when it comes to being an author?

Study your craft. FINISH what you start. Enjoy the journey. Dedicate yourself to the journey. And then, study it more. Feeeel what you’re writing, don’t just type words.

Lastly, can you provide any links that feature Shadows of the Keeper?

Amazon: http://goo.gl/R9M70N

iTunes/iBook: http://goo.gl/2mDvgu

Barnes & Noble—Nook: http://goo.gl/9VPjS5

Kobo books: http://goo.gl/H1F1JM

Scribd.com: http://goo.gl/yiETG6

Inktera.com: http://goo.gl/OJsxCe

 

 

Advertisements

Seeing Things

Nancy Young cover

“True love is like ghosts,” wrote Francois de La Rochefoucauld, ” which everyone talks about and few have seen.”

Over the years, film, television and fiction have given us a bounty of stories in which star-crossed soul mates discover themselves up against the greatest divider of all – that pesky line separating the living and the dead. Whether it’s the hero who longs to be reunited with a beloved bride that was snatched from his arms too soon or a wistful heroine who has reconciled herself to the belief that all the best men are married, gay or a possible figment of their imaginations, author Nancy Young delivers a fresh twist in her latest novel, Seeing Things.  When you’re out to debunk the existence of ghosts – as well as deny your own ability to see them– what’s a girl to do when the sexy techie whose attention she has attracted is, quite literally, out of this world?

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

**********

 Q: So tell us a little about your journey as a writer and who (or what) was the greatest influence on your quest to become a published author?

A:        I was hooked on writing from the time the teacher posted my lion story outside our first grade classroom. Even my research reports in school tended to morph into narratives. In the college where I worked, a group of us met weekly for critiquing sessions, which helped me grow out of that awkward beginners’ stage, rife with poems about butterflies and roadkill.  Drafting up to 17 stories a week when I was a reporter gave me confidence as a writer. Once I quit teaching, I had the time to publish poems, short stories, and plays. I started the novel because everyone in my writing group was working on one, and I didn’t want to feel left out!

Q: Were you a voracious reader when you were growing up? If so, what book titles might we have found on your nightstand?

A:        I grew up in the local library—literally. My mother was a librarian, and after school I’d hang out, sometimes helping alphabetize cards, but most often working my way through the collection, graduating from the children’s floor to the adult section by the time I was in middle school. (It was a very small library.)

As a girl, I read and reread The Wolves of Willoughby Chase, The Witch of Blackbird Pond, Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle, The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, as well as Mary Stewart novels, Victoria Holt novels, Poe’s and Vonnegut’s short stories, and an assortment of folklore anthologies. My guilty pleasure was those Gothic paperbacks—the ones with a nightgown-clad woman running in terror from a brooding castle. My favorite of that genre still sleeps in my bedside table: Moura by Virginia Coffman. From the list, you can see that I’m drawn to a mix of supernatural/ fantasy elements, strong characters, and dark humor.

Q: You’ve described your newest release, Seeing Things, as a romance with paranormal elements. What’s your attraction to this particular genre?

A:        The two genres are a perfect balance of light and dark. I love the tensions of romance—the friction, the rising stress, and the eventual capitulation. With paranormal elements, I can introduce unpredictability—a plane where intelligence and logic have no impact. Since I prefer strong characters, the complications they face have to be out of their immediate control.

Q: What was the inspiration behind Seeing Things?

A:        This book started out to be anti-genre. The central character is neither innocent nor naïve. She doesn’t want to be rescued.  Her love interest isn’t a taciturn alpha male, either. I took a sly delight in having Mary Catherine reject the typical hero.

Q: Have you ever had any ghostly encounters similar to those experienced by your intrepid heroine?

A:        When I was a T.A. in grad school, I shared an office with a folklore expert. He was often called upon to investigate odd phenomena and invited me along on investigations. At a plumbing supply business in Northeast Philly one bright winter afternoon, I heard bells chime in a wall where there were no bells, saw a clock run backwards when its power source had been cut off, and looked over a strange arrangement of paper plates and a dead bird on a breakroom floor. Since the business owner was anxious to keep the investigation secret lest it hurt business, a hoax seemed unlikely. This scenario found its way, in a different form, into a chapter of Seeing Things.

Another example occurred when I lived in a hundred-year-old farmhouse. In the attic (accessible through a trap door in my bedroom), hats, tools, and an old Royal typewriter had been left behind by the original owners. That typewriter would periodically have a new line of type on the tattered, yellowed sheet rolled into its platen. My kids were under five and couldn’t have accessed the attic without help—nor could they spell, for that matter.

Out of curiosity, I participated in an EVP study at Rhine Research Center, a parapsychology center that was originally part of Duke University.  Though most of what I heard in the controlled study was static, two voices sounded loud and clear. I have no idea if those were “control” sounds or actual examples of paranormal recordings.

Oddly enough, things like this fail to bother me. Put me in heavy traffic on the Beltline, though, and my palms will sweat.

Q: What governed the choice to pen this story in the first person? For instance, do you feel a special kinship with the narrator?

A:        I actually wrote the first few chapters of Seeing Things in third person before recasting it in first. The first-person POV won out with everyone who read both versions. So many of the great Gothic narratives are written in first person—Brontë’s Jane Eyre, Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart,” Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper,” du Maurier’s Rebecca. First person narratives bring immediacy to a story and create a close bond between narrator and reader. Most importantly, this point of view allows for dramatic irony; the reader sees more than the narrator does. I loved playing with that notion with Mary Catherine, my protagonist.

Some readers hate first person novels, and I knew I was taking a risk. Don’t let anyone tell you it’s the easiest perspective to write in. When it’s done right, it’s amazingly challenging. For instance, readers want to know what a character looks like, but real people don’t describe themselves. Finding innovative ways to impart such information’s like a literary game.

Early on, I thought my narrator had little in common with me, but as the book progressed, I realized we suffer from some of the same issues. My local librarian even remarked that the woman on the book cover looks like me.

Q: Unlike typical romances that are formulaic in nature – as well as predictable – you opted to incorporate unexpected twists in character and plot. Why did you decide to go this route?

A:        When I was browsing the in the public library two years ago, I picked up book after book with the same basic plots, the same interchangeable, tiresome characters. When I started writing my own novel, I set out to create a book I’d like to read—one with a funny, complex central character, an atypical love interest, and a plot that pokes into unexpected places.

Q: Would you call yourself a plotter or a pantser and why does this your choice of development style work well for your personality?

A:        I’m a pantser for most of the writing process, at least until I write myself into a dilemma and have to type my way out of it. Even though I like to feel in control of the worlds I create, my characters develop minds of their own, veering off in unanticipated directions. A good writer, like a good director, has to be flexible. In the editing process, however, I’m meticulous.

Q: Have your characters ever surprised you?

A:        They often say things I didn’t expect, and then I have to rethink the plot line. My novel characters turn out to be every bit as complicated and contradictory as real people. Developing their arcs is like watching a child mature.

Q: Tell us about the title of the book and what it means to you.

A:        Seeing Things hints at much: questioning what is real, what is imagined, what is true. People constantly close their eyes to things they cannot face. I remember teaching Oedipus Rex to a class of students who thought that Oedipus should have closed his eyes (pre-poking them out) to the evidence of his guilt, remaining happy in his ignorance. I never understood how anyone could do that.

Q: What’s your favorite novel or movie about someone falling in love with a ghost?

A:        I watched The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (Gene Tierney, Rex Harrison) when I was little, along with the old Dark Shadows TV show. And my husband and I still dance to “Unchained Melody” from the Ghost soundtrack.

Q: If, hypothetically, one day you return as a ghost yourself, where would you most likely be hanging out and why?

A:        I’d be in my office—the tower room of the Victorian house I live in. The current residents would hear the faint tapping of my keyboard late at night, and the cat would refuse to cross the threshold.

The writer might die, but the words live on.

Q: How did you go about finding a publisher for this project?

A:        I had submitted my novel to two or three big publishing houses, and it languished in the slush pile. After reading a NYT article, I aimed instead for a small publishing house and had my work accepted.

Q: “Home” for you is a small town in North Carolina. How has this influenced your life as a writer and the interactions with your non-writer neighbors?

A:        When you ask a question around here, you get a story in response. The South teems with unusual people who speak in colorful metaphors and act unpredictably. Many of my poems and short stories stem from local lore: the lost woman walking the streets twirling a hula hoop, the church organist who suffered a breakdown when faced with a new electronic keyboard, the raging diva displaced from a local singing group.

My close friends are writers and artists. To keep myself grounded, though, I joined my neighborhood book club. Most of the other members are literal people who work with computers. Unsurprisingly, we have different tastes.  I often think their book choices would benefit from the addition of a zombie, especially those dreary stories about the Episcopal priest. They find me quirky. I consider that a compliment.

Q: What would most people be surprised to learn about you?

A:        I like heavy metal.

Q: If you could summon the ghost of any famous person in history to have a chat with, who would it be and what question would you most like to ask?

A:        John Donne. As a young teen, I’d daydream about him while I studied his picture on the cover of the Norton Anthology. Donne was such a fascinating mixture of passion and intellect, and he gave up everything for love. I’d ask him if he thought it was worth it.

Q: What are you working on now?

A:        So many things—the third book in the novel series (the second’s awaiting publication) , another novel featuring a minor character from Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, a scene for a Regency play, and a short story about a pregnant woman going quietly insane.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you?

A:        My bio is published on Amazon and Goodreads, as well as on my publisher’s site http://www.worldcastlepublishing.com/author-nancy-young.html . I also have a Web site, http://nancymyoung.com.

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?

A:        The sequel, Hearing Things, should be out in 2015.

 

 

 

Vampire in the Scrying Glass

VampireInTheScryingGlass

Vampires, mortals and forbidden love sound juicy when it comes to R.E. Mullins’ delectable yet thrilling series, Blautsaugers of Amber Heights. With her latest debut, Vampire in the Scrying Glass, just released on Halloween, vampire lovers will eat up the action, romance and secrets that abound in this fantasy tale of the living and the undead.

Interviewer: Christy Campbell

**********

Let’s start by telling readers about how your creative journey as a writer first began.

I’ve lived most of my life inside my head. Even as a young child I was always daydreaming and weaving fantasies to entertain myself. I would tell my mother bizarre stories—always with me as the lead doing something outrageous and heroic—as if they’d really happened. In an effort to make sure I understood the difference between fantasy and reality, she’d always bring me back to earth by asking, “Is this something that really happened or something you’d like to have happen?”

I was faced with this wild imagination in my second child. Once he came home from preschool and told me there’d been a fire but he’d put it out using water from a puddle and saved everyone. It was then I understood how my mother must have felt when listening to me.

When I got a little older, I started making up episodes for my favorite TV shows and characters. I think the very first ones were for The Partridge Family and The Mod Squad.

Where did you get the ideas for your novels?

I worked as a phlebotomist for ten years. Consequently, I’ve been called a vampire, bloodsucker, and, my personal favorite, a tick. I’ve heard about every vampire joke ever written and it got me to thinking… What would happen if a phlebotomist was turned into a vampire? That story turned into the first novel I ever wrote called: It’s a Wonderful Undead Life. It’s the story of Cailey Kantor and how she meets the Blautsauger family and gets turned into a vampire.

My second novel: Vampire In The Scrying Glass which came out on Halloween 2014 can be read as a standalone but also deals with the Blautsauger family. It is the romance between Cailey’s friend, Morgan Maguire and the youngest Blautsauger son, Rafe.

Did you start with an outline or simply wing it as you went along?

Ha! I always try to start with some type of outline but it never lasts long. The characters in my head (which I call my voices) are too demanding and obstinate. They go their own way.

Is there a lot of research involved during the writing process?

Yes, I must say research is one of my favorite things to do. I can get lost in researching names, Wiccan philosophy, magical tools, demonology, and poisons. In Vampire in the Scrying Glass, I tried my hand at doing some scientific research while trying to devise the artificial blood formula Michaela and Morgan are working on. Hopefully, it sounds convincing enough—though I’m sure it’ll make a real scientist cringe.

I also do a lot of research on historical timelines and style. Whenever I refer to the one of my vampire’s past, I want to make sure they dress and act accordingly.

Was anyone in your circle of family and friends allowed to read chapters in progress or did you make them wait until the whole thing was done?

Ah, poor Melanie. She was one of my co-workers and I chose her (okay blindsided her) as my very first reader because I thought she’d give me an honest opinion. I was afraid closer friends or family members might be too worried about hurting my feelings. Let me say, Melanie turned out to be a great choice. She was a real trooper, read it all, constantly encouraged me, and corrected a lot of punctuation.

I heard you like to include names with hidden meanings and other trivia in your books?

Yes, I’m guilty of that. I use the term Nosferatu to refer to vampires of European descent and Toltec for the vampires coming out of Mexico and South America. Of course Nosferatu is a 1922 German Expressionist horror film and the Toltecs were a bloodthirsty and warring ancient tribe from central Mexico.

Blautsauger is the Bavarian word for bloodsucker. I named the vampire siblings: Gabe, Michaela, Metta, and Rafe based on the angels of prayer: Gabriel, Michael, Metatron, and Raphael.

Ixchel is the Mayan Moon Goddess, and Eztli gets her name from the Nahuatl dialect word for blood. At the back of Vampire in the Scrying Glass my editor put in a short glossary of how to pronounce several of the names and their meanings.

Since I always like to learn new things when I’m reading, I also try to include something my readers might not know. For instance, the actual name for a blood pressure cuff is a sphygmomanometer.

In Vampire in the Scrying Glass, I also include an account of one of my more disastrous blind dates.

Swapping to the personal side of things, we live in a world where technology is abundant. Readers have become addicted to electronic means so they can devour their favorite books. What is your preference – an old fashioned hardback, paperback or eBooks?

I love books. I like holding them. As my daughter once put it, it’s nice to physically feel and watch as one side of the book decreases and the other side increases as you progress through the chapters. I like the sturdiness of a hardback and the slickness of a paperback. I held out against eBooks and then my children sent me a Kindle for mother’s day… Now it goes with me everywhere. I love how I can adjust the font size when my eyes are tired and how I can carry hundreds of books in one compact package. It makes it ideal for travel and I appreciate how my suitcase no longer weighs a ton with everything I want to read while on vacation.

As an adolescent and teen reader, what were some of your favorite titles and authors that had the most influence on your personal style as a storyteller?

I have always been a voracious reader. Books opened up a whole new world for me starting with See Spot Run. I graduated from Dick and Jane to Dr. Seuss, Little House on the Prairie series, the Boxcar kids, Robinson Crusoe, Swiss Family Robinson, Moby Dick, The Witch of Blackbird Pond, and My Side of the Mountain. I always had a book in my hands. I still do.

I read most of the classics starting in Junior High: The Scarlet Letter, Stoker’s Dracula, Shelley’s Frankenstein, Gone with the Wind, and Hunchback of Notre Dame to name a few. I went through a period where I read every biography I could get my hands on. I loved the ones on Henry the VIII and each of his wives, Gypsy Rose Lee, and Marilyn Monroe. Then I read Harwood’s So Merciful a Queen So Cruel a Woman about Queen Elizabeth the first. I read it right after reading Good Queen Bess by Diane Stanley and Peter Vennema. This was an eye opener for me. One book portrayed the Monarch as all sweetness and light while the other painted a much darker picture of her motives. It was at this time I began to understand that everyone, even our most revered heroes, are flawed. These differing viewpoints presented an uncomfortable and challenging dichotomy for my young mind.

I know I’m forgetting many wonderful of the wonderful books I read during my adolescent and teen years but I’ll stop here. I will say that as an adult I mainly read romances and want my “happily ever after”. These days I rarely read anything too weighty and want my escapism.

Last but not least, give us the scoop on where readers can find out more about you and your series.

Twitter handle: #REMullins

Facebook page: www.facebook.com/…

Goodreads author page: https://www.goodreads.com/REMullins

Go to Goodreads and enter the drawing for a free copy of VAMPIRE IN THE SCRYING GLASS

Buy links:

Amazon link: amzn.to/ZQ8n5Y

Wild Rose Press: http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=195&products_id=5867

Blog: http://remullins.blogspot.com/

 

 

A Love Beyond Time

A_Love_Beyond_Time_Cover

Time is too slow for those who wait, too swift for those who fear, too long for those who grieve, too short for those who rejoice, but for those who love, time is eternity. – Henry Van Dyke

Everyday fortune is something we all take for granted at times. The last thing anyone expects is dreams to come along and throw life into a tailspin. For one young woman, who has it all, these dreams will prove to send her on a journey she’s never anticipated. A journey through an unknown world that will offer a chance to learn how love has no bounds of time.

Interviewer: Christy Campbell
**********

Tell us a little bit about Dante Craddock the author.

Dante Craddock, as you may know, is my pen name. I use a pen name instead of my real name for writing romance. I plan to write in multiple genres in the not too distant future and want to keep my work in each genre separate from one another.

A Love Beyond Time is Book One in a series. Give us some background on this first installment?

Ashley Brannock is pretty much your average woman in her mid twenties. She has a good job and is establishing herself in her chosen career as an interior designer. She has a loving boyfriend and two roommates that she is very close to. Everything begins to change the first night she has the dream. The dream slowly drags her down, sucking the life from her. Each and every night it invades her sleep, awakening her with a shock and afterwards she finds that sleep will not come at all. The dream poses many questions to her. Only the answers to those questions can free her from its life sucking grip.

So where did the idea for this series come from when you decided to put pen to paper?

The initial idea came from the song Whiskey Lullaby by Brad Paisley and Alison Krauss. The song – and especially the music video for it – posed a question in my mind. What if they were given a second chance? From that simple question came the idea that became A Love Beyond Time. That idea eventually grew into the Power of Love Quartet

Do you have a careful plan when plotting your stories or do you just go with the flow?

When I started writing I went with the flow, but after several years of going nowhere with the story I decided to change my approach. When I got back into doing serious writing I changed my approach completely. For the second half of A Love Beyond Time I plotted out each individual chapter. Then went back and wrote a first draft from that. I don’t completely lock myself into these chapter plots. They are a guide to what I write in the first draft and are open to change if the story needs to be changed to make it better.

Today’s genres vary so much in the world of reading. Which genre did you feel best suited your book?

A Love Beyond Time is a Contemporary Romance with a paranormal twist to it.

With many publishing routes available today, which felt the most reliable to you when it came to the many choices?

I initial went the self publishing route, but found I lacked the skills to be a really good self promoter. Self promotion is a must if you want to go it alone. I believe if you are good at that part of the process then self publishing is a good route to take. If you aren’t, then you should try and get published through one of the smaller publishing firms. The big five houses are nearly impossible to get into as a first time author. The smaller houses are more willing to take the chance on your success. Once you establish yourself as an author, your options will grow and you can then reevaluate your choices.

When did you know you truly wanted to give writing a shot?

I caught the writing bug years ago, but it never really got into my blood until the last couple of years. I decided I wanted more out of my life and a career as a writer offered me better opportunities. Financial reasons did factor into that decision, but I found myself truly needing to write out the wild ideas that are dancing through my head.

Is there an upcoming release date for the rest of your Quartet?

I’m presently working on writing the first draft to A Memory of Love, the sequel to A Love Beyond Time and I plan to have it ready for publishing sometime in 2015. I want to publish each of the remaining books over the next couple of years.

Are there any social media sites where readers can learn more about you and your work?

Website
http://www.dantecraddockauthor.com/

Facebook Author page.
https://www.facebook.com/DanteCraddockAuthor

Goodreads Author page.
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6582924.Dante_Craddock

Twitter
https://twitter.com/DanteCraddock

Pinterest

Where can readers find your book in the market?

A Love Beyond Time can be purchased direct from the publisher as a signed paperback: at http://www.fountainbluepublishing.com/, and also at Barnes & Noble and Amazon in both ebook and paperback.

Porcelain Keys

Sarah_Beard

Over the course of the last year and a half, I have read more books than I had read in my previous years combined, and among those stories, I have my favorites. Sarah Beard’s debut novel, Porcelain Keys, is one of them.

Sarah put a lot of her own heart into her words, and though it took her five years to get the story to where she wanted it to be, the perseverance seems worth it. I was captured from the first sentence and the rhythm swept me up to the last page. Visit Sarah at http://sarahbeard.com.

Interviewer: Joanna Celeste

**********

Q: Porcelain Keys centers around Aria, a gifted pianist. As a music aficionado, was the process of writing fiction much like that of composing?

A: Since music is mostly a hobby for me, I generally don’t put too much thought into my piano compositions—I just sort of let my heart lead the way. Whatever I’m feeling or thinking about comes out as music. Once I get a melody down, I’ll usually add some depth to the piece, but for the most part they’re just simple, heartfelt compositions.

I guess the first drafts of my books are that way, too. I just write what I feel without thinking too much about whether or not it’s going to work. Then once I have the story down, I go back and analyze it to death. I tear it apart and rework it over and over until I get everything just right—plot, characterization, pacing, setting, dialog, conflict, tension, etc. Each element has to be considered separately, then together as a whole.

A book could be compared to a symphony or concerto. You have all the different instruments playing different parts, serving different purposes, and when all put together you have something grand and beautiful. I don’t compose musical concertos, just little solo piano pieces, so it’s simple and easy. My books, on the other hand, are literary concertos. If one instrument (pacing, plot, etc.) is out of tune, it sours the entire work. Only when all the instruments work together and complement each other can a literary concerto become a moving masterpiece.

Q: Yes, it’s an intense process with editing being the primary focus. Throughout thefiveyear journey of writing your novel, what are some key moments or pieces of advice that strengthened you to keep moving forward?

A: There were countless times I wanted to give up during the writing of this book. Like when my critique partners would point out plot problems that seemed too big to fix, or when I couldn’t pin down a character’s motivations. I would go home feeling discouraged and would want to scrap the whole thing. But a woman in my writers group, Shauna Dansie, once gave me a great tip. She suggested that when I come across a story problem that seems impossible to fix, that I should write it down on a little piece of paper and set it aside somewhere safe, then continue working on other parts of the story. The theory is that you know in the back of your mind that there is that big problem that needs to be fixed, but you don’t have to worry about it because you have it written down somewhere. So your subconscious does all the work. And one day as you’re folding laundry, the solution just pops into your head. Or you wake up in the middle of the night, and you know why your character did that stupid thing. It worked every time.

Another piece of advice that stuck with me was one I received at a writing conference. I was sitting across the table from a literary agent at dinner (great opportunity—or so you would think) and I told her a little about my book and asked her which genre it would be—YA or women’s fiction—since the story begins when my character is 17 and ends when she is 19. New Adult was not yet an official category, so she basically told me that no publisher would ever pick up my book because there wasn’t a market for it. My shoulders must have visibly slumped because author Stephanie Fowers, who was sitting next to me, leaned over and said something like, “Don’t worry, Sarah. Just write the story you want to tell and don’t try to fit into anyone’s definition of what makes a marketable book.” I took her advice to heart and stopped worrying about trends and categories, and just wrote what I wanted to.

Q: That’s brilliant advice, since we can’t really help but write the story that is there to be told. Without being outwardly religious, there is a certain quiet weave of spirituality in your writing. Life seems to hold its own essential divinity, as you would have experienced in giving birth, surviving cancer, and living in general – but did you seek to share a particular message, or was the writing organic?

A: When I first started writing Porcelain Keys, I didn’t set out to share a specific message or lesson, I just wanted to write a great love story. But I think on an unconscious level some of the lessons I’ve learned in my own life seeped into the story. I’ve learned from experience that it’s possible for people to change and overcome character flaws, and that damaged relationships can be repaired. I also know that grief can cause people to do things they wouldn’t otherwise do. So as I wrote the story and my characters did certain things, I used my own life lessons as a reference to help me decide whether or not their actions were realistic and believable. It wasn’t until after I finished writing the story and had to start describing it in query letters that I really thought about what messages it contained.

Q: That’s awesome. On your blog you shared the inspiration of Porcelain Keys but we didn’t read the particulars of the scene that germinated your book. If you remember, please share it with us.

A: Yes, I remember the exact details of the scene. In fact, I still have it saved in a first draft (it’s horribly written, by the way). I didn’t share it on my blog because my story changed over time and the scene ended up having no relevance to the story. But it was a scene where Aria comes home from college for summer break, and she is going through a box of memorabilia when she discovers a necklace that Thomas gave her before he left town. She is surprised to see it because she thought she had gotten rid of it, and it brings back all the memories of their time together and the painful events surrounding his disappearance. This is the scene that sparked all of the questions that led me to my story. I had to know who these people were, why Thomas had left, and why he hadn’t returned as promised. For me, it was like an intriguing mystery that needed to be solved. And as I discovered the answers to these questions, I fell in love with the characters and knew that I had to tell their story.

Q: Thank you for sharing that. This is perhaps like asking you to name your favorite child, but do you have a favorite scene from your book? One that, no matter how many times you read it, resonates with you?

A: This is a tough one to answer without giving away too much of the story, but one of my favorite scenes is in chapter nineteen when an unexpected visitor walks into the parlor. My heart swells every time I read it, even though I’ve read it five million times. I also love the scene where Thomas gives Aria a painting—it always brings tears to my eyes because I know how much it means to her. The hardest scene to write was in chapter twenty-two where Aria and Thomas have a long talk—I must have rewritten it at least a dozen times—but it turned out to be one of my favorites.

Q: I loved those scenes, too. That seems to be the hardest part of being a writer, or any artist—knowing when to step away from the story and let it out into the world. Porcelain Keys is published by Sweet Water, an imprint of Cedar Fort. You mentioned that they have been wonderful to work with – what have been some of your adventures in publishing?

A: I haven’t had too many adventures in publishing since this is my first novel, but I did spend about seven months querying literary agents before being accepted for publication by Cedar Fort. During that time I sent out a total of 45 query letters, and got a few bites, including a 2000-word email from an agent listing all the things she loved about my manuscript—and all the things she wanted me to change. I was on an airplane when I got her email, ready for takeoff, and I only got the gist of it before I had to turn off my phone. I spent the four-hour flight wanting to die, and then give up writing, and then die again. It’s the worst feeling, spending hundreds or even thousands of hours on a manuscript, only to have someone tear it apart and tell you all the things you should change.

But when I got home and got a good night’s rest, I opened the email and read it more thoroughly. I realized that she actually really liked my book and had a lot of great suggestions—which was a good sign. Literary agents don’t usually give that much feedback unless they’re really interested in your manuscript. So I took most of her suggestions and implemented them. But there was one big change that I didn’t agree with and felt would make my entire story collapse. Because of this, I didn’t feel she was the right agent for me. So I kept sending out query letters to other agents. Around this time, a friend lent me a book that was published by Cedar Fort, and I really loved it, so I decided to send my manuscript to Cedar Fort. And two months later I got an email from their acquisitions editor saying they wanted to publish it—just the way it was.

Q: Congratulations! You also mentioned that you look forward to a long working relationship with Sweet Water. Do you have a second book planned?

A: I’m working on another young adult romance right now. I don’t want to say too much about it, but it’s set on a California beach and involves chocolate, surfing, and supernatural elements. I also have detailed outlines for two more after that, both young adult romances.

Q: That is wonderful! What will you take from this launch, to utilize in your next release?

A: I’ve learned that when it comes to getting the initial word out about a book, bloggers and book reviewers are a writer’s best friends! Also, it’s pointless to stress about things that aren’t in your control, like which bookstores will pick up your book, or whether or not reviewers like your book. Stress kills creativity, so I’m learning to stop hovering and instead get back to what I can control: writing more books!

Q: Good plan! What, if any, is/are your life motto(s)?

A: I don’t really have a life motto, but there are things I try to remember everyday: That life is short and that I should make the most of each moment. That worldly success is enjoyable, but can’t bring lasting happiness. Only my relationship with God and my family can do that. They are the constant in the ups and downs of life. They will be there when fans and literary agents and publishers are not. So God and family always come first, because to lose my relationship with them would be to lose everything.

 

She’s A Lot Like You

RS_ShesAlotLikeYou

Secrets, desires and betrayals…the perfect concoction for a fiery romantic novel. In Faye Hall’s soon to be released She’s A Lot Like You, one woman has returned to her roots, seeking revenge and faces an obstacle she hadn’t prepared for: the former love who broke her heart but left her with a passion she’ll always remember. Can old flames be reunited, despite a scandalous past?

Interviewer: Christy Campbell

**********

Tell us about your latest release. 

My latest release is She’s A Lot Like You, and it will be released in April 2014.  Set in 1860, in the town of Ravenswood, Queensland, Australia, it tells the story of young love torn apart by the deceitful lies of their families.  Reunited finally to reveal the truth behind their families’ secrets and to experience a love neither ever dreamed could exist.

How did you get started as a writer?

I started writing poems and short stories at primary school.  While most kids were in the playground, I’d be under a tree somewhere, or in the library writing little things.  Most of what I wrote was influenced by the people I knew, or certain people I saw that just kind of managed to stay in my mind.

When did you decide to branch out into the romance genre?

I would have been about 15 when I wrote my first romance.  It wasn’t really planned, though.  The words were all kind of just there in my head until I just had to write them down.  It was as I wrote the ending, were the two main character got to live happily ever after, that I realized this style of writing was definitely for me.

What kind of research do you do for your book material?

My books are all set in North Queensland, Australia in the late 1800’s so I’ve had to research a bit about the towns there at the time, and what the lifestyle was like.  The main bit of research I’ve had to do though is regarding the few mentions of native remedies used by the Australian Aboriginals.  That was extremely interesting.

Your books contain a fair bit of mystery and drama even though they are romances. Why did you decide to throw those concepts into the mix?

I grew up watching old Agatha Christie movies with my mum and I loved all the twists and turns and scandal they detailed.  But then I loved the old classic romance movies too.  I always thought if I could find a movie that contained all this it would be my perfect one.  As when I write I see each scene playing like a movie in my head, I thought maybe I should give it a go trying to write such a style myself.  And so I did.

You hail from Australia, as does the setting for your books. What’s special to you about this location?

I love my country.  I love the rustic realness of it all.  And I feel it isn’t a setting that’s been done to death.  I thought if I could maybe bring a little bit of Australian history out in my stories that could only be a good thing.

What’s a typical day like for you when you devote yourself to writing?

I have quite a large family so I rarely get a ‘day’ to devote myself to writing.  Most of my writing is done after my kids are in bed or early in the morning before they wake up.  But usually my husband makes me a cup of tea and I just sit in front of my computer and type whatever story is flowing from my mind at the time.  I have rough notes down about what I’d like to happen in the particular story I’m working on, but as I constantly tell my husband ‘it is subject to change’.

When asked to name three, short facts about Faye the person, not Faye the author, what would those be?

I grew up in a very small rural town in North Queensland, Australia.  Between my husband and me we have 9 children. And, here’s an odd one, I’m allergic to artificial blue food coloring.

What are you working on at the moment?

I’m working on something a little more different than my other books.  It’s called ‘Passions in the Dust’.  It’s set on a cattle station in Bowen, Queensland, Australia, and is about a man who send for a mail order bride from England.  The woman who arrives was one of his mistresses back in England.  There’s some cattle rustling and cows being poisoned by native aboriginal ways and…well…the rest you’ll just have to read about when it comes out.

We all dream, of course, about seeing our books in screenplay format. If you could make one of your book into a movie which title would you choose and who would portray your characters? 

It would have to be ‘My Gift to You’. Chris Hemsworth (from the Thor movies & Rush)  to play Bailey and Anna Kendrick (from Pitch Perfect & Twilight saga) to play Rush.

Where can readers learn more about your novels?

My websites  http://www.faye-hall.com/

http://eredsage.com/store/FAYE_HALL.html

My blog http://www.faye-hall.com/?cat=16

My social media https://www.facebook.com/pages/Faye-Hall/174774709247649

https://twitter.com/FayeHall79

 

Angels Dawn

Angels_Dawn_final_ebook-1

Friends, cute boys and lots of fun are the usual expectations of a teenage girl’s birthday affair. Unless you are the key to a past crime that you can’t remember. In Komali da Silva’s debut novel Angels Dawn, one typical teen girl finds herself thrown into a world of intrigue and danger on her sixteenth birthday, with a dose of mysterious romance on the side.

Interviewer: Christy Campbell

**********

When did you first decide you wanted to be a writer?

Actually, it was never my plan. I always wanted to study sports medicine but that plan was destroyed because I was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis. I had to stop doing sports for a while and I found time to read. I found my life and dreams in those books.!I was always good in writing but never invested time willingly. One day, I was on my way to work. I was sitting in the train and this idea came rushing into my mind. First thing I did was take a piece of paper and write it down, so the journey began.

Tell us about Angels Dawn. How did you come up with the concept of this novel?

I just saw these three characters in my imagination waiting to come out. Then I started writing with the description of Dawn and the story began to write itself. It’s mainly written in Dawn’s point of view because I felt very close to her. She is a 15 year old girl, living in a small town in Florida. On her 16th birthday everything changes in her life. It’s a teenage love story with a bit of a dark twist in it.

How many books are there in your debut series? 

I’m planning for three but it could also be four J

When you sit down and get to work, what habits or routines to do you have?

I always read the last chapter I wrote, that way I can start at the same place where my thoughts left me. Sometimes I even read a chapter or two of a book I really like, so that I’m inspired to write.

What is it about the young adult market that nabbed your desire to write for that genre?

It’s strange, I’m a 30 some year old woman, but I love reading young adult books. It keeps me young in heart and mind. Toni Morrison once said, if there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it. So that’s what I did.

Who were some of the authors and titles that may have influenced your writing journey?

Becca Fitzpatrick: Hush Hush series, Carlos Ruiz Zafon: Shadow of the Wind, The Angel’s Game and the Prisoner of Heaven. J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter, all of them books And of course Lauren Kate: Fallen Series, Teardrop and not to forget Charles Dickens: Oliver Twist – It was the very first book I ever read.

Do you know where the story is going when you sit down to write it, or do you prefer to have an outline?

With Angels Dawn, I had a different ending planned but when I was almost there, my fingers typed something very different. I like that ending way more than the planned one so I polished it up and let it flow. I’m not an outline person. I like my imagination to play with my ideas. I think good books always need to have its freedom. I’m not the storyteller it’s the story, which tells the author what comes next. 

That’s how I feel with my books.

When it comes to leisure reading, what are some titles you might recommend for teens?

That’s a tough question. I love all the books written by Lauren Kate. I’m a crazy fan girl when it comes to my favorite authors. Lauren Kate visited Milano, Italy on her book tour and I traveled by train to Milano only to meet her. May be I should mention that I live in Bern Switzerland. So that’s like four hours by train to Milano. We got a lot of amazing authors out there; some of my absolute favorite authors include Cassandra Clare, Carlos Ruiz Zafon, Cecelia Ahern, J.K. Rowling, Becca Fitzpatrick, Kami Garcia , Margaret Stohl, P.C. Cast and Richelle Mead.

What are the biggest challenges for authors attempting to break into the young adult market?

There are many good and talented YA authors in the market, so it’s very difficult to get the readers to see your work. There is so much of promotion behind the process and one got to have a lot of luck on her side as well. And of course, readers love to compare. That doesn’t help much but don’t we do that too? 😀

What’s up next for your adventures in writing? 

At the moment I’m writing Fight for Dawn, book two of the series. Then I hope on finishing the series. Then I also have an idea for another novel. But it’s going to be a stand-alone and not YA related.

 

Angels Dawn is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle.