Ten Days in Summer

Calder-TenDaysInSummer[825]

In chatting with novelists over the years, it has always fascinated me how they go about choosing careers for their protagonists. Some of those professions are dream jobs the writers themselves would love to have pursued–provided, of course, they could gracefully pirouette across a stage without tripping, fearlessly jump out of a plane to pursue a villain in the alps, or design breathtaking architecture that truly takes everyone’s breath away. Others draw from personal experience and give us insider insights into career choices with which we may not be familiar The insurance industry, for instance. The latter was the case for author Susan Calder, who drew from her expertise as an insurance adjuster–and her remembrance of some of the more unusual claims–to create a most watchable series character, Paula Savard. In her new novel, Ten Days in Summer, we meet Paula as she is investigating a suspicious building fire that caused the death of a hoarder.

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

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Q: What (or who) first ignited your passion for writing?

A: As a child, I wrote a few plays for the kids on our street to perform for our mothers. I also enjoyed writing stories and poems for school, and got encouragement from my teachers. My sister and I spent countless hours making up stories with our paper dolls or simply with our voices talking out characters. I set that kind of storytelling aside for 27 years, until a personal crisis shook me up and landed me in a place where I felt I had things to say and wanted to create stories again.

Q: Were you a voracious reader as an adolescent and teen? If so, what are some of the titles we might have found on your bedroom nightstand?

A: I recall an uncle admonishing me for burying my nose in a book rather than appreciating the sunset, so I must have read a fair bit. My most memorable books on my teenage nightstand were Gone With The Wind, High Wind in Jamaica, The Catcher in the Rye and The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell. I also loved two novels we studied in class: Pride & Prejudice and Of Human Bondage. They led me to read other novels by Jane Austen and Somerset Maugham. Glad as I am that I read all of these books and more, I think my uncle was right about the sunset.

Q: What attracted you to the mystery genre?

A: My childhood reading included an abundance of mystery novels. Whenever I found a series I liked, I read every book I could get my hands on. It began with The Bobbsey Twins and continued to Nancy Drew, The Happy Hollisters, Trixie Belden and several British series. In my teens I enjoyed Mary Stewart’s romantic mysteries and later I got into Agatha Christie and Daphne du Maurier. So, mystery novels were never far from my nightstand and we tend to write what we read, for good reasons. Several themes intrinsic to the mystery genre appeal to me. The search for the truth. Who can you trust? What’s really going on beneath the surface?

Q: Who are some of the mystery authors whose work you especially admire?

A: Dennis Lehane, Laura Lippman, Donna Tartt’s The Secret History, for their complex characters and plots. I like Donna Leon’s Commissario Brunetti series for its Venice setting and the dark story endings that rarely show justice completely served. And I still think my classic favourites, Agatha Christie and Daphne du Maurier, stand up to the best of mystery writing.

Q: In your view, what governs the choice to make a mystery novel a standalone title or a series?

A: When I wrote my first novel, Deadly Fall, I intended it to be a standalone. Paula, my protagonist, functioned as an amateur sleuth and I wrote it as a story of personal growth within a mystery plot. It was only toward the end of the second draft that I thought I would like to continue with these characters, to see what happens to them next. This was partly because, with the attention needed for the mystery of the victim’s life, I didn’t have space to explore all I wanted about Paula. A standalone is probably a story where the protagonist primarily investigates her own life. It becomes her defining, life-altering experience and why would she need another one?

Q: One of the biggest advantages of series fiction is that one’s lead characters are already well known to readers. A challenge, though, is in ensuring that one’s readers actually read the books in the same order in which they were written. Is this the case with your own work or could a reader be introduced to your protagonist at any juncture in the line-up?

A: I think a new reader to the series could pick up book 2, Ten Days in Summer, and quickly become acquainted with Paula, her family, friends and colleagues. They are where they are at this point in their lives and I make little reference to past cases and experiences. I plan to do the same for book three. Except, there are a couple of spoilers in Ten Days in Summer for those who read Deadly Fall afterward and there will probably be one more spoiler in my next book for people who read that one first.

Q: What aspects of your real-life career in the insurance industry influenced your approach to planning and writing works of fiction?

A: I wanted Paula to have a career and figured it would be easiest to give her one I know well—insurance adjuster. It didn’t occur to me until I was almost finished with the first draft of the novel that adjusters might stumble on insurance claims that conceal a murder, such as burglaries, fires and automobile accidents. Rather than continue with Paula as an amateur sleuth, a genre that’s hard to make believable, I wanted her next mysteries to come from her job. To start each novel off, I have to think of the kinds of insurance claims I encountered in my work.

Before Deadly Fall, my insurance career inspired a short story called “Adjusting the Ashes,” which in several ways is a forerunner to the Paula books. I chose a type of case we encountered periodically, which I found peculiar and humourous. Our company insured a brewery. Every so often someone would claim he swallowed a mouse in his bottle of beer. We settled these claims for nominal amounts to get rid of them. But I thought, what if one of these nuisance claims mushroomed into something huge? This story has been published so I can’t do the mouse swallowing again, but it would be fun to come up with an unusual claim for a future Paula story. Maybe for book four.

Q: Ten Days in Summer is set in Calgary. What elements of this city’s “personality” are infused in the storyline and make it as much a living, breathing character as the human players?

A: The Calgary Stampede wild west festival takes over the whole city of Calgary for 10 days each summer. People dress cowboy and cowgirl; banks and stores sport bales of hay and drawings of horses on their windows. I wanted the atmosphere to permeate the novel and I doubt there’s a chapter without some reference to the Stampede. Several scenes feature it prominently. Another aspect of Calgary is that it’s an oil town, subject to boom and bust. Ten Days in Summer is set when the price of oil and the city is near bottom, and that mood prevails in the book. But during the booms, Calgary’s a place where people come to try their fortune or escape their past. It’s also a city of entrepreneurs and individualists, reflecting the western spirit. I try to bring this out through the characters Paula meets in her investigation. Paula, herself, is a migrant from Montreal, who moved west to improve her life and found that everything didn’t work out as she’d hoped. Now she’s moving in new directions.

Q: What was your inspiration for this particular plot?

A: I was mainly inspired by the Stampede and Hoarding. Since Deadly Fall was set in the fall, I wanted the sequel to take place in another season and settled on summer. Among other things, summer in Calgary means the Stampede. I find two weeks or thereabouts a good time frame for a novel and realized I could set the whole story over the Stampede’s 10 days. My sister had once lived on the top floor of a building with a view of downtown Calgary and the Stampede grounds. I joined her one evening to watch the fireworks from her deck. I decided the novel would begin with Paula at the opening day parade and end the last night of the Stampede, with a group of characters watching the fireworks from the deck of the building damaged in the fire claim Paula was investigating.

At the time I was developing the idea, my siblings and I were engaged in assorted legalities regarding our late grandmother’s house. With our mother also gone, we had to deal with her only sibling, a hoarder who occupied the home’s second floor. He made things so difficult that I decided to fictionally kill him off. A hoarder’s home would be a high fire risk, which gave me the idea to have this character die in a suspicious building fire. Paula would come in to handle the property insurance claim and deal with his heirs, who gained financially from his death.

Certain things changed in the process of writing the book. I discovered it worked better to start the story the night before the parade. Technically, it’s still Stampede time, since the fair grounds are open for preview on this sneak-a-peek night. And the hoarder character inspired by my annoying uncle became the most sympathetic character in his fictional family.

Q: Which comes first for you – the characters or the storyline?

A: The characters. For Deadly Fall, I first thought of Paula, her associates and her family members. Then came the inciting plot incident—her best friend from childhood is murdered. Next more characters arrive: two detectives, people from her friend’s life. Their actions and agendas fuel the plot, which develops all the characters, including Paula.

For Ten Days in Summer, I already had Paula and the continuing characters in place. So the characters came first again. To start things off, I needed a plot point, the insurance-related incident, and decided on the fire. Through her work, Paula meets people involved with the victim and the claim. They create plot and are, in turn, affected by story developments.

Q: Do you work from an outline or allow the plot to unfold as you go along?

A: I start with a few elements – basic ideas for characters, a murder or suspected murder, and setting details. I also have some thoughts about what’s happening in Paula’s personal life. Paula spends the first quarter or so of the novel draft meeting with suspects, colleagues and family members, setting up the story problems. I try to write loosely, letting unexpected details and dialogue creep in, while keeping on top of the pacing, to make sure this beginning doesn’t get sidetracked or go on too long. From this setup, the plot unfolds. There should be enough to keep it rolling to the middle, when I need new wrinkles to raise the conflicts and tension until the end.

Q: You’ve won a number of contests for your short stories and poems. Are these two outlets easier or harder than writing a full-length novel?

A: Generally speaking, I find the more words in a piece of writing, the longer it takes to write and revise to make the best I can. In that sense, a full-length novel is harder than shorter works. The few short poems I’ve written have come to me almost fully formed. I can write them down in an afternoon. After that, I tweak and revise, but there are only so many words and punctuation marks to play with. I also feel I’m not experienced enough in poetry to know how to improve poems a lot. I haven’t won contests for poems, but have published four—vs. only two published novels that represent many more years of work.

While there are contests for unpublished novels, there are many more contests for unpublished poems and short stories. Usually these contests come with publication. I discovered I had better luck getting my short stories published through contests than through regular submissions. Perhaps this was a fluke, or perhaps there is less competition in contests due to the entry fee. To build a resume of published credits, I entered contests and sometimes won or placed. It’s nice to say now that my stories have won contests, but it doesn’t mean more than publication.

Q: Do your characters ever surprise you over the course of writing their story? 

A: Since I develop my characters in the process of writing the story, they always surprise me, at least in small ways. A large surprise in Deadly Fall was realizing, in draft # 4, that a character I had not considered a suspect might be the killer. I seriously considered changing my plan about who did it. I figured, if I hadn’t had a clue, how many readers would? In the end, I stuck with my original vision, although this character’s new involvement in the case solved a plot glitch.

Q: If Hollywood came calling, who would you like to see cast as Paula Savard?

A: This is fun. Since no one came immediately to mind, I did a Google search for Hollywood actresses aged 50. I like Diane Lane. She’s not highly recognizable and I’ve admired her work in movies. I can also see that a number of others who are more familiar could suit the part and infuse themselves into Paula’s character. Choices might be Emma Thompson (if she’ll do a Canadian accent), Andie McDowell, Julia Louis-Dreyfus or Julianna Marguilies, who I enjoyed on the TV show ER when she was involved romantically George Clooney’s doctor character. I could handle George Clooney as my movie’s male romantic lead.

Q: How much was research was involved and what were your principal resources to ensure authenticity?

A: My insurance work experience was long ago and didn’t involve many property claims. At a literary reading, I happened to talk with a man who told me that he’d recently retired from insurance claims work. He gave me his email address and I contacted him with questions about insurance, to get those details right and up to date in the book. To learn about building fires, I called a friend’s son who is a fire fighter and met with him and his colleagues at a Calgary fire station.

When I was writing my first mystery, Deadly Fall, I belonged to a Calgary Mystery Writers group that featured monthly speakers on topics related to crime writing. Some of these were police officers or others with knowledge relevant to my book. I learned much about police procedure here and also took the free Calgary Citizens Police Academy course, a 12-week program with speakers from different branches of the police.

Any time I step outside my immediate experience, I have to look things up, even something simple like the location of a particular street. The Internet helps. I read a couple of books on hoarding to confirm and enhance my understanding of this psychological condition. It’s surprising how much research you need to do for a contemporary story set in your home town, but I want to make things as accurate as I possibly can.

Q:  Do you revise and edit scenes as you move along or wait until the very end? Why is your chosen method an effective one for you?

A: I write to the end before doing any editing. The rare times I might revise a scene would be when I can’t move forward without doing this. Since I don’t write from an outline, the first draft becomes my process of developing the story and discovering what it’s all about. Only when I reach the end do I fully know if the novel works and what I need to add, delete, change or enhance in the earlier chapters.

Q: Do you let anyone read your work in progress or do you make them wait until you have typed THE END?

A: Ideally, I wait until I’ve typed THE END. I believe the first draft should be only the writer’s vision. After that, you find out how the story and characters are coming across to others and modify them for readers. Now that I have more confidence in my writing, I will occasionally show people small pieces before I’ve finished the first draft. For someone newer to writing, I think if you show your work too early, you risk being swayed too much by their opinions and you might lose what’s strongest and most original about your story.

Q: When and where do you feel you do your best wordsmithing?

A: I mainly write at home, in my den at my computer and don’t feel the need for different locations to wordsmith better. I like writing best in the mornings, when I’m fresh, but other activities often get in the way of this.

Q: What, for you, is the hardest part of the writing life and what helps you to move past this hurdle?

A: Rejection. By this I mean rejection from publishers and losing out on contests and awards that I’d thought I had a chance with. It’s also criticism of my writing at any stage in the process, from showing an early piece of work to others or receiving a critical print review.

What helps me move past this, is forcing myself to sit down and write. Before long I’m into it, and realize that it’s the process of writing that I love and it’s not really about outside opinion.

Q: What would readers be the most surprised to learn about you?

A: That I read The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell as a teenager? It surprises me to recall that I did, partly because today we don’t hear much about this philosopher, mathematician, political activist and 1950 Nobel prize recipient for Literature. ‘Bertie’ inspired me to take a math option at university because he declared that math was essential to the study of philosophy.

On the other side of the intellectual coin, for the past forty years, off and on, I’ve followed Coronation Street, the British TV soap opera about working classes residents in Manchester. I enjoy the tangled relationships between those everyday blokes. This was one thing I didn’t need to research for Ten Days in Summer, when I made Paula’s mother a Corrie fan.

Q: When you’re not writing, what do you do for fun?

A: Travel. Over the past few years, my husband and I have been to Europe and Mexico several times each. We make regular shorter trips to eastern Canada to visit relatives and friends.

Hiking. For the past 8 years, we’ve belonged to a hiking club that does weekly day trips to the nearby Rocky Mountains from May-Oct. Our club organizes an away trip each summer, this year to Revelstoke where I’ve never hiked before. The rest of the year, we do two hour walks in Calgary and region parks. Every couple of years, a member organizes a hiking holiday. This winter, about 25 of us spent a fabulous week in Mesa, Arizona.

I also enjoy my twice-weekly Zumba class and look forward to bicycling when the ice and winter grunge finally disappear from Calgary’s pathways and streets.

 

 

 

A Chat With Joan Hall Hovey

Joan Hall Hovey, Photo: Cindy Wilson/Telegraph-Journal

Joan Hall Hovey

Interviewer: Debbie A. McClure

 I’m very pleased to introduce thriller/mystery writer and fellow Canadian, Joan Hall Hovey. Joan has been blessed with a talent for telling dark stories that stay with the reader and keep them asking for more. A self-described “avid listener of stories”, she loves weaving tales that chill to the bone, however she enjoys a quieter, saner life in her lovely home in Saint John, New Brunswick. Welcome Joan!

Q: What is it about writing thrillers and dark mysteries that holds and keeps you?

A: It’s hard to know why I’m drawn to the dark side in the human psyche. Some people can’t get enough romances or westerns. My son and granddaughter are hooked on SciFi, but since childhood you could always get my attention with a good ghost story, or any story that had tension and chilled the blood.  I read everything by Edgar Allan Poe, love the Gothic suspense novels, my favorite being Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre. I collected my pennies and went to see all the scary movies. Later I discovered authors Ruth Rendell, Patricia Highsmith of the Ripley books, and Stephen King.  All those authors have influenced my work in some way.

Q: You often write about strong women who are facing challenges in their life, or who must learn to trust themselves and others. What is it you want female readers to take away from your stories?

A: My main job in writing a suspense thriller is to entertain; to keep my readers at the edge of their collective chairs and turning those pages until the last and hopefully satisfying sentence. The underlying message in my books is that we’re stronger than we think we are. We find this out when we’re forced to draw on that inner strength we didn’t know we had in the face of challenges that can shake us to our very core. Most of the time we manage to come out the other side, not only relatively intact, but often to find we’ve grown in confidence and in our ability to not only survive, but thrive.

Q: What do you think is the future for print and e-books, and why?

A: I think print books will be around for a long time to come, but many people, including me, have also embraced the technological age. I have always had a passion for books. I love the heft of them, the smell, everything about books. Unfortunately, my eyes are no longer as sharp as they once were, and I can make the font on my Kindle as large as I need it to be. Because I like to read in bed (too busy writing and teaching during the day), the Kindle is very lightweight to hold in my hand, so my arthritis is thankful for it.

Q: What advice would you give to new writers just starting out on this crazy journey?

A: Focus on your writing, make it the best it can be, and try to write every day. Pick a time that works best for you. I like to write in the mornings before the rest of the world is quite awake—that time between the black and gray zone. This is how you become a disciplined writer. Learn to do the work whether or not you’re inspired, because a page you’re not happy with can always be edited and improved. The rest—publishing your book, promoting it, etc., can be learned. You can Google anything today.

As far as publishing your work goes, writers definitely have more options today than when I began. You can try for a big publisher through an agent, or a good small press, or you can even self- publish.  If you choose the latter road, keep in mind that you’re solely responsible for everything involving your book’s success. 

Q: Would you say writing the beginning, middle, or end of a book is the most difficult for you, and why?

A: I don’t find one part of the novel more difficult than another. If it’s going well and I am really into my story by experiencing what my characters are experiencing, seeing clearly those scenes in my imagination, I’ll be fine. It’s not easy, although there is nothing I can think of that’s more rewarding. Expect lots of trial and error.  Some authors like to outline, while others write by the seat of their pants. I’m somewhere in the middle. I outline mainly in my head, and take copious notes as I go along. Sometimes a plot problem will solve itself while I’m on a walk, or doing the dishes. Magic happens when you’re there, deep in the book.  Stephen King calls those great gems that come to you when you least expect them gifts from ‘the boys in the basement’.

Q: Many of your books contain an element of the supernatural in them. Have you had any experiences with the supernatural that you can share with us?

A: Yes, there are a few occurrences in my life that caused me to wonder, and sometimes even lose a little slept. I want to keep those to myself, though, so I can draw on them for future books.  

Q: As an actor you have the opportunity to act out characters and experience storytelling in a very different way. Does your acting experience influence how you write?

A: Absolutely. Just as I enter the skin of the character I’m portraying on stage, it is the same with my characters on the page. I really must inhabit their bones, take on the emotions and sensibilities of the character, because it’s how I’m able to grasp that character and make him or her real to the reader.

Q: So many novice writers balk at learning to effectively use social media and the Internet, including Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, blogs and book trailers, in order to connect with other writers and readers. What advice would you give them when it comes to marketing and promoting their work?

A: There are literally thousands of books on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and so on. Readers will simply never find your book if you don’t find ways to point them to it, and we’re so lucky now to be able to take advantage of social media and the internet. Marketing your book is your job as the book’s author; it goes with the territory. It can be the difference succeeding as an author or not, regardless of the level of your talent. I’d suggest spending an hour or two each day on promoting your work.

Q: What have you learned about others since you began writing?

A: I’ve been writing stories and poems since childhood, and then professionally for more than 40 years, so it’s difficult to say. The writing grew and changed as I grew and learned. I believe that’s true for most people. In September 2015, I lost my dear husband of 63 years, following a lengthy illness. It was a numbing shock, even though I knew death was inevitable. It has changed my life in ways that I don’t even understand. I’ve learned that you recognize the changes more with the passing of time, but rarely while they’re happening.

Q: Can you tell us a little about your latest novel?

A: My latest release is titled ‘And Then He Was Gone’. Here is a little about it from the back of the book:

AVAILABLE FROM AMAZON PRINT/EBOOK and other online bookstores.

WHERE IS ADAM?

Julie Raynes’ husband has been missing for six months. Devastated and confused, she refuses to believe that he would leave her voluntarily, though her best friend thinks differently. However, her Aunt Alice, a psychic, tells her Adam has been murdered, and when she reveals how she knows this, any hope that Adam is still alive, dissipates.

The police are also beginning to believe that Adam Raynes was murdered. And Julie is their prime suspect. Her life in ruins, Julie vows to hunt down whoever is responsible for Adam’s murder and make them pay for their crime.

In the meantime, David Gray, a young man who was pulled from a lake by a fisherman when he was 9 years old, wakens from a coma after nearly two decades. Unknown to Julie, Adam and David share a dark connection, a darkness that threatens to devour both of them, in a terrifying race with death.

Q: What’s next for you Joan?

A: Probably another suspense novel, but I want to explore other options as well . I have always loved writing short stories, so I may return to that at some point. I will say that I expect they will also fall somewhere on the dark side.  🙂  

You can find Joan here: http://www.joanhallhovey.com

And she loves to hear from readers.

 

 

 

Raisin the Dead

 

Karoline Barrett

“Cooking,” wrote American journalist Harriet Van Horne, “is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all.” The same can be said about the craft of writing, and when these two passions come together in a culinary themed mystery, it’s the recipe for a mouth-watering delight that leaves readers hungry for more. Karoline Barrett – today’s featured author – joins the ranks of Ellie Alexander, Miranda Bliss, Christine Wenger and other kindred spirit wordsmiths whose protagonists have a taste for solving neighborhood crimes. In Barrett’s latest release, Raisin the Dead, library director Anne Tyler is a person of interest in a murder, a scenario that compels bakery owner Molly Tyler to step in to help clear her mother’s name.

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

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Q: When did you first know that writer’s ink was flowing through your veins and you just had to do something about it?

A: I’ve always enjoyed writing, but didn’t take it up seriously until I was older (we won’t discuss how much older). My husband encouraged me to take writing classes from an online writing school in Connecticut, where we now live, called Long Ridge Writers Group. They were wonderful and I learned so much. My very first published novel, The Art of Being Rebekkah, started as a short story in one of my classes.

Q: Stylistically, what authors (living or dead) do you feel have had the greatest influence on your own approach to storytelling?

A: Ann B. Ross (author of the Miss Julia series) because of her character portrayals, they’re so very real, and Janet Evanovich because of her humor.

Q: The Bread and Batter mystery series is a clever concept. What inspired it?

A: I was having a hard time thinking of another writing project and my agent asked me what I liked to read. The answer was mysteries. She suggested I write one, and I took her advice. I like discovering new bakeries, so I wanted the series to center around Molly and the bakery she owns with her best friend, Olivia. I’m happy to say it worked out.

Q: Which of your characters is secretly your fictional self?

A: I’m asked that a lot. In reality, my characters come from my imagination. If I had to pick the one I want to be my fictional self, it would be Emily, the owner of Barking Mad books. I’ve always thought owing a small bookstore would be delightful.

Q: Favored baked dessert – a cake, a pie or cookies?

A: Since ice-cream isn’t a choice, chocolate cake with chocolate icing (do you see a chocolate theme here?)

Q: Store-bought or homemade?

A: Homemade. The best kind!

Q: In your daily writing routine, when and where do you feel you are at your most energized?

A: I’m a morning person, so I do well between 7 a.m. and 3 p.m. My writing desk faces a window, so I navigate between that and my recliner when I’m writing.

Q: Do you allow anyone to read your material while it’s still a work-in-progress or do you make them wait until you have typed The End?

A: They have to wait. My work-in-progress goes through a lot of changes between the time I type the first work and the time I type The End.

Q: Which do you feel is more challenging – to pen a short story, to develop a stand-alone novel, or to create recurring characters for a series?

A: I’ve done all three, so I have to say a series. I have to keep each book fresh, make sure all the characters come back with the same names, eye colors, etc. Make sure the town names haven’t changed. It’s also a challenge not to say too much about the previous books in case someone hasn’t read them yet. Then there’s the challenge of keeping all the characters interesting.

Q: Let’s say Hollywood comes calling to turn Raisin the Dead into a new TV series. Who’s on your wish list for casting?

A: I have to confess I don’t keep up on who’s who in Hollywood. I don’t know who the Gilmore Girls are, and I thought The Game of Thrones had something to do with Queen Elizabeth. I’m going to chicken out of this one and say I’d be so thrilled to see it as a TV series, I don’t care who was playing the characters. Although, I’d love to hear from readers on whom they think would be good casting.

Q: How did you go about finding the right literary agent to represent your work?

A: As mentioned, my first novel was The Art of Being Rebekkah. I compiled a list of agents who were looking for women’s fiction.  I got a lot of requests for the partial manuscript, and the full manuscript, but no takers. After going through 120 agents, I was thinking about calling it quits. Then, on Twitter, I saw someone discussing Frances Black. She and a partner own Literary Counsel. Okay, I thought. One more time! She loved my book and signed me. The rest, as they say, is history.

Q: What’s your favorite thing about being published?

A: Pleasing my readers and having them ask for more books!

Q: Promoting a new title is almost as much – if not more – work than writing it in the first place. What are some of the activities you’re pursuing in this regard to put your book(s) on everyone’s radar?

A: It really is! I’m a constant presence on Facebook. Both on my author page and personal page. I’ve connected with a lot of other authors, readers, and bloggers. I do a lot of blog tours and giveaways. I love the giveaways, but I make my husband pick winners. I just can’t do it. I’d pick everyone!  Since my Bread and Batter series is e-book only, I can’t do book signings, which I’d really like to do.

Q: To celebrate your success, you’ve made reservations for dinner at your favorite restaurant and can invite any three famous authors to join you. Who are they, what are the seating arrangements, and what question would you most love to ask each of them?

A: I’d have Shirley Jackson, Janet Evanovich, and Debbie Macomber. I’d be at the head at the table, so I could see and hear everyone.  Shirley’s question would be, “How on earth did you come up with The Lottery? It’s my favorite short story of all time.” For Janet, I’d want to know how she comes up with all the scrapes her characters get in to and how she keeps all her books so funny and fresh. I’d like to talk character development with Debbie. Her books are so character driven, which is what I love about them.

Q: What would readers be the most surprised to learn about you?

A: I want to write a psychological thriller like The Girl on the Train.

Q: What do you do when you’re not writing?

A: Read, shop, spend time at the beach. Think about writing.

Q: Do you typically read one book at a time or have multiple stacks throughout the house?

A: I can handle reading two books at once, but more than that and my brain starts complaining.

Q: What are you reading now?

A: I just finished A Muddied Murder by Wendy Tyson. Time for a trip to the library!

Q: What’s next on your plate?

A:I’m working on book three of my Bread and Batter series, I’m outlining a new series I want to present to my agent, and I also have a romance half-written.

Q: Best advice to aspiring writers?

A: Write what you love, believe in yourself, and have patience, lots of patience.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you and your work?

A: My website is karolinebarrett  On Facebook, readers can find me here, KarolineBarrettBooks

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?

A: Thank you so much for having me, it’s been fun! Of course, a thank you to all my readers!

 

 

My Husband’s Sin

My_Husbands_Sin_by_Mary_T_Bradford_200

Even from beyond the grave, there are no limits to the havoc a vengeful family member can inflict on his or her mourners. Such is the premise of Irish debut novelist Mary Bradford’s new release, My Husband’s Sin. Like many an aspiring author, she took to heart the encouragement of family and friends who told her she should seriously seek out publishing opportunities for the stories she was writing. We’re glad she did … and happier still that we can introduce her work to our global readership.

*****

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

Q: Tell us about your journey as a writer and, in particular, what led to the decision to write your debut novel.

A: My writing life began many years ago when my four children were small. I wrote down all the mischief and antics they got up to. People read them and said I should think about writing other stories. I started with short stories and the buzz of seeing my work in print was wonderful. I never thought about writing a novel, but one day, a short story I was writing just kept growing and hey, I had my first novel.

Q: Having penned short stories prior to My Husband’s Sin, which do you feel upon reflection is the greater challenge – writing a full-length work or stand-alone vignettes?

A: Oh good question! I think a novel proved the greatest challenge for me. I can spin off short stories and enjoy it. But now that I have completed a novel, I know I can do it, so it is not the daunting prospect I once thought, but yes it’s still a challenge.

Q: Are you a plotter or a pantser (and why does your choice suit your personality)?

A: I am a pantser. When I get an idea, it percolates in my head for a while and I talk to myself, asking, okay I know how it starts but how does it end? Once I have a vague idea of the ending, I am happy. I sit then and write. As the story goes along, I find all these channels open up and the characters bring me along with them. I do not make outlines or plot ideas or writing boards etc. I trust my story idea to run on its own legs.

Q: Who are some of the writers that not only fueled your passion for storytelling but may have also influenced your own writing style?

A: I have been reading since a young child. Enid Blyton was my favourite as a child. I became a member of my local library at four years old and devoured all I could get. I never saw myself as a writer when growing up. I don’t have a favourite author as an adult as I read a lot of different genres. Regarding my style, I seem to write like I speak when chatting with someone, so I’m told. Maybe I can be bold and say Maeve Binchy’s warm easy going style appealed to me.

Q: If you could sit down for dinner with one of them, who would it be and what question would you most like to ask?

A: I think it would be Enid Blyton. I would love to learn more about her life as a writer. The question would be, who influenced her?

Q: Where (and when) is your favorite place to be creative?

A: I go to my local library each morning for three hours. Then if I am on a deadline, I continue at home. But I prefer to write outside of my home as there are less distractions. When I am really being creative, I try to get away on my own for a few days and enjoy the solitude of having uninterrupted days to write and think about new projects.

Q: You live in Ireland, one of the loveliest countries on the planet. How does it feel to be in the spiritual company of Oscar Wilde, C.S. Lewis, Bram Stoker, George Bernard Shaw, Maeve Binchy, William Butler Yeats, James Joyce and Jonathan Swift? (Seriously, is it something in the water that makes all of you such savvy and prolific wordsmiths?)

A: Honestly I don’t think of it. All these wonderful authors you mention and hundreds more are just people who write. I think it is like a lot of things in life, when it is on your own doorstep, you can take it for granted. Now that you have brought it up though, it’s great to be an Irish writer, J

Q: Has there been a defining “Aha!” moment in your career that affirmed your dream of being a writer had come true?

A: Yes, when I got offered a contract. I was thrilled, there was someone else out there who believed in me. So thank you, Tirgearr Publishing for making my dream come true.

Q: There’s no shortage of people who make wishes for a second chance to reset their lives, make amends, and reconnect with family and friends that have fallen by the wayside. In your own case, you underwent the risks of open heart surgery. Upon successfully emerging from this experience, how did it affect the way you look at life, relationships and the world in general?

A: I was so ill before the operation I did not think about what was involved, I was so glad to be given a chance to become better again. But after the op, I thought how precious good health is. It is everything. Without it, how can one enjoy life? I don’t worry about tomorrow anymore, I take each day as it arrives and I do not plan days ahead. I live for now and I have found I have more peace of mind living like this.

Q: Tell us a little about the premise of your new book and the inspiration to open with the unsettling reading of a matriarch’s final will and testament.

A: The idea for My Husband’s Sin came to me while at a funeral. I looked around at the other graves and wondered what secrets were buried there. Then I thought, what if someone spilled a secret deliberately to cause hurt and harm? So working with this, I picked on Lillian, the mother, because for most people, the heart of a home is their mother, the person who loves you unconditionally, who will always hold you close to comfort and listen to you. So to have the mother shatter the family intentionally is unbelievable and disastrous for Lacey, the youngest in the Taylor family.

Q: If Hollywood came calling to adapt this novel to a feature film, who would comprise your dream cast for it?

A: Gosh I have not thought about something as wonderful as this happening, honestly. Right now I don’t know, so I shall have to get back to you on this one.

Q: How did you go about finding the right publisher for your work once the book was complete?

A: I googled publishers and made a list. I sent My Husband’s Sin off to many and got the rejections which is part and parcel of writing life. When I was going through my list of publishers, I saw that I had not sent it to Tirgearr Publishing Ireland, and for some odd reason, I kept putting it off. Then when I did eventually get my ass in gear and approached them, they very promptly got back to me with the offer of a contract.

Q: What do you know about publishing now that you didn’t know when you started?

A: I have learnt that whether you are traditionally published or self-published, the author has a ton of promoting and marketing to do. Publishing houses no longer promote their authors with massive media coverage, especially new writers. So a big part of my day is finding new ways to promote and get my work out there before new readers.

Q: What’s next on your plate?

A: Since, My Husband’s Sin has been published, as an Ebook and in paperback, I have signed a new contract with Tirgearr for their City Night’s series in erotic romance. My novella titled, One Night in Barcelona, is number 13 in the series. I have also being contracted to write two novellas under the auspices of Writers of the West. My first, The Runaway, set in America’s 1800’s, is a story about a young lad who leaves home to better his life, but unfortunately his past catches up with him. My second, a romance, Destiny, again set in Americas 1800’s is due out before Christmas. All are available on Amazon, Nook Kobo, etc. I am also at present writing my second full length novel, a paranormal. I like to stretch myself as a writer so I am writing across genres at present before settling on a favourite.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you?

A:

On Amazon US at the following link http://amzn.to/1PAW9l2

On Amazon UK at the following link http://amzn.to/1PPBfOX

Tirgearr Publishing http://tirgearrpublishing.com/authors/Bradford_MaryT/

Readers can find out more at my blog, http://marytbradford-author.blogspot.ie/

So Much for Buckingham

So Much For Buckingham cover art

Former actor and stage director Anne R. Allen is a wonderfully funny mystery writer who loves to bring some levity to what can be dark, heavy topics. Anne also co-authors a well-written, widely read blog and has worked on joint projects with other writers, so in addition to penning her own books, it’s clear she knows how to operate as a team player. What a pleasure it’s been getting to know Anne and her work, and if you haven’t already read her books, we’re thrilled to introduce her to you.

Interviewed By Debbie A. McClure

******

Q         You combine comedy with mystery writing. That can’t be easy, or is it? What is the easiest and/or most difficult aspect to writing this type of book?

A         Actually, what’s hard for me is taking the comedy out of my writing. I find humor in everything. Always have. When I was about seven, I used to put on puppet shows in my back yard. Lots of carnage. Lots of laughs. I was a twisted kid. LOL.

When I try to write heartfelt, deeply emotional stuff, it falls flat. I like fast-paced stories that are fun, but leave you with something to think about later.

Mysteries were an obvious choice for me. I’ve been a mystery fan since I read my first Nancy Drew book, and since then I’ve read all the classics: pretty much everything by Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, Margery Allingham, Ngaio Marsh, Josephine Tey, Chandler, Hammett, etc. I’ve written a few books that aren’t standard whodunnits, but they always have a mystery element. I think I like the structure involved with the mystery genre.

My newest book, So Much for Buckingham, is the 5th in my Camilla Randall series of comedy-mysteries. It deals with some major issues: cyberbullying and character assassination. I also delve into the mystery of whether Richard III really killed the princes in the Tower (I don’t think he did.). Camilla’s best friend gets accused of killing an historical re-enactor dressed as the Duke of Buckingham. The only witness is apparently the ghost of Richard III. I hope people will find it funny and thought provoking.

Book #4, No Place Like Home, deals with homelessness and “bag lady syndrome”—the fear many older women have of ending up homeless.

Because I write funny mysteries, I get to deal with these issues in an unsentimental, detached way that examines all sides and still provides a lot of entertainment.

Q         Many writers today struggle with how to fit into this new e-landscape we’re seeing. What advice would you give to someone just starting out?

A         Number one: let go of the idea that paper books are the only “real” publishing. Most authors now make the bulk of their money from e-books.

Also, accept social media as a necessary evil and then find aspects you can enjoy. For me, it’s blogging. Every author needs to find a place online where they can interact and make friends. That’s where we find readers and mentors—and maybe an agent and publisher.

I’d also add this advice to new writers: don’t believe everything you read online. Lots of the publishing advice on the internet is old, misguided, or just plain wrong. Always consider the source and read widely.

Q         Who has been your greatest life or business mentor, and why?

A         I’m very lucky that I made friends with my Central Coast (CA) neighbor, Catherine Ryan Hyde (author of Pay it Forward and Amazon superstar) early in my career. She has been an inspiration and mentor to me for the last two decades. She’s an amazing human being. I am so blessed that she agreed to co-write a handbook for writers with me: How to be a Writer in the E-Age: A Self-Help Guide.

Her ups and downs over the last twenty years have shown me that there is no certainty in this business, and you need to keep in touch with your readers and stay true to your voice no matter what.

Q         You and I are both representatives of the “Boomer” generation. What advantages would you say we have over our mother’s and grandmother’s generations?

A         Oh, there are so many! Tech alone has totally changed the process. I started writing in the days of typewriter ribbons and carbons, and younger people don’t realize how time consuming all that stuff was. No cut and paste. One typo and you had to start the page over with a carbon.

And now we have email queries. I still have some of those old nesting boxes we used to send out our manuscripts with postage for return. Expensive! Plus all that postage …

And of course there’s the fact women have so much more freedom and respect than they did in the early and mid-20th century. As an unmarried female, I’m not expected to live with other family members as their live-in servant, the way “old maids”, divorcees, and widows did in my grandmother’s day.

Even my mother had to fight hard for respect, even though she had an Ivy League PhD in English literature. People accept me as an authority because of what I say, not my gender. That’s such a huge thing that younger women take for granted.

Q         Writing is far more difficult than most people understand. Was there anything in your past professions as an actress and/or stage director that helped prepare you for this role of writer?

A         Acting and directing are great preparation for a novelist!

As an actor, you learn you always need motivation for whatever action you take on stage. A novelist needs to remember that even the most minor characters need to have a goal and a purpose in every scene.

As a director, I learned what short attention spans audiences have, and how to keep up the pace and never let up. The immediate feedback of rapt attention and laughter vs. coughing, rustling programs, and trips to the restroom lets a director know what works and what doesn’t.

Q         What would you say has been the most difficult personal lesson for you to learn in life?

A         I used to be way too trusting and giving. When I was younger, I always judged other people by myself and assumed everybody had honest, altruistic motives.

I’ve had to learn that accepting people as they present themselves can lead to grief. Learning to recognize narcissists and sociopaths and avoid letting them dominate my life has been a huge (and tough) life lesson for me.

But I’ve had so much fun killing them off in my novels! LOL.

Also, I’ve had to accept that I have more highly tuned senses than most people, so I can easily get over-stimulated—which leads to health problems. So I can’t push myself past my limits with things like NaNoWriMo, big conferences, or marathon book tours. Learning that I’m a “highly sensitive person” has finally allowed me to learn to say no to overload and overwhelming situations.

Q         What do you see as the future for publishing and the new e-technology, and why?

A         Obviously the e-reader has changed the publishing industry in a major way, and the changes keep coming.

I’d like to believe the publishing industry won’t go the way of the music business, where everything is expected to be free and people think artists shouldn’t be paid. Definitely the new paradigm has led to a lower bottom line for most traditional authors.

It has also given rise to the self-publishing movement, which is great for a lot of authors, and I’ve even self-published some of my own books.

But the “Kindle gold rush” is over, and lots of amateur writers who hoped to make millions are giving up now. Kindle Unlimited has cut into the self-publishing bottom line in a major way for a lot of us.

Self-publishers will need to spread a wide net on many platforms and many countries in order to succeed.

Things will never return to business as usual  pre-Kindle days, but we also can’t party like it’s 2009. Self-publishing will continue to be a viable option, but only the savvy and hard-working will make a living at it.

I think bookstores will continue to exist, the way movie theatres do, in spite of Netflix, Hulu and other streaming sites. People like the whole experience of visiting a bookstore.

Q         You’ve collaborated on three projects now, one with author Catherine Ryan Hyde, and two with NYT million-seller author, Ruth Harris. Can you tell us a little about them, and what you feel are the advantages of writers partnering?

A         I have co-written one book with Catherine Ryan Hyde. Ruth and I collaborate on our blog and we put together a two-fer boxed set of two of our novels, CHANEL AND GATSBY, but we didn’t write them together. We just combined her CHANEL CAPER, and my GATSBY GAME in between digital covers.

I’ve also worked with other novelists on some boxed sets and anthologies, when we worked a lot on co-promotion. These were fantastic opportunities to network with other authors in my genre and meet new readers. I think authors should jump on any chance to collaborate with other authors in boxed sets and other co-promotions. It’s a fantastic way to expand your readership.

The book I co-authored with Amazon superstar Catherine Ryan Hyde, How To Be A Writer In The E-Age, came together very easily because it was a nonfiction book and we wrote alternate chapters. We were already good friends, so it was a great experience.

Q       Blogging has become something more writers are discovering, but often struggle with how to create a “voice” or meaningful content. What recommendations would you give to writers just starting out on this blogging path?

A         Actually, I’m writing a book the subject. Because I’ve managed to build a very successful blog, averaging about 90,000 hits a month, with nearly 4000 subscribers, I think I am uniquely qualified to help new authors build a blog.

The most important thing to remember about blogs is that they are part of social media, and social media is, well, social. Authors need to interact and respond to comments, as well as visit and comment on other blogs.

A good way to find your voice is to pay attention to how you comment on other blogs. Use that voice on your own. Don’t preach, brag, or condescend. Just chat. Treat people as if they’re visitors in your living room.

Q         What are your thoughts on the traditional vs self-publishing debate so prevalent in our industry right now?

A         I don’t think all authors are cut out to self-publish. It’s very hard to make the big time if you’re starting to self-publish right now and you’ve never been published before.

The days of breakout Amazon stars like Hugh Howey are pretty much over because Amazon’s algorithms no longer favor indies, and Kindle Unlimited has drastically reduced royalties. It’s also hard to get traction on other retailers like iTunes and GooglePlay if you’re an indie.

But self-publishing is fantastic for established authors who get dropped by their publishers, or who want to supplement their income with novellas and stories between “big books”.

I would recommend that non-tech-savvy writers try for traditional publishing first, especially if they write literary fiction or children’s lit—which sell better in brick and mortar stores.

I don’t know of any literary writer who has an exclusively indie career that’s taken off. I think that’s because literary writers depend on reviews in established print magazines.

And children’s books (except for YA) don’t sell as well in e-books as adult genre fiction does.

But it is true that writers going the traditional route need to be much more wary than in earlier times. They need to find agents or small presses that understand the new paradigm and will allow them to self-publish between books, and won’t offer odious contracts that tie up work for your lifetime plus 70 years.

I’ve been with a series of small presses, some of which were better than others, but they always gave me my rights back with no problem. I also learned a lot and got great editing.

Now I have some books with a small press and some are self-published. That works for me.

I think most authors should plan to self-publish at some point, but I don’t think it’s a good first step for most genres, unless you’re really a savvy marketer with a lot of books in the hopper ready to go.

Romance, mystery, and thriller writers may be an exception. I think they can do well self-publishing right out of the gate, especially if they write fast and have a lot of titles. I know a number who do.

Q         What is it about writing mysteries, especially those with, ahem, older female protagonists that draws you in and holds you?

A         I love writing stories that mix mystery and romantic comedy, especially when the protagonists are older people. In No Place Like Home, 60-yr old former billionaire, Doria, reconnects with her homeless high school sweetheart. That was so much fun to write.

And how often do you read romantic stories about older people? It’s fun to do something different.

Q         What’s next for you, Anne?

A         So Much For Buckingham launched July 8th and is now available.

After that, I’m working on a series of short books for new authors on subjects like blogging, building a platform, writing that first chapter, etc. I’m calling them “two-hour courses” –simple, “just the facts ma’am” type information you might have to plow through a lot of big books or blog archives to get. Plus, I put my own humorous spin on things.

I’ll also be starting my next Camilla book, which has the working title, The Knight of Cups.

Anne blogs with NYT million-seller Ruth Harris at Anne R. Allen’s Blog…with Ruth Harris (http://annerallen.blogspot.com/), named to Writer’s Digest for Best 101 Websites for Writers. She is also the author of eight comic novels, including the hilarious Camilla Randall Mysteries. SO MUCH FOR BUCKINGHAM, which launched July 8, 2015, is #5 in the series but can be read as a stand-alone.

For more on Anne, please check out her links below:

Amazon.com author page: http://www.amazon.com/Anne-R.-Allen/e/B005R2SBI4

Goodreads author page: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5304269.Anne_R_Allen

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/annerallen1

Twitter: https://twitter.com/annerallen

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/pub/anne-r-allen/10/262/493

Google+: https://plus.google.com/+AnneRAllen/posts

Email: annerallen.allen@gmail.com

A Conversation with Ruth Harris

Ruth Harris Books

Ruth Harris is a million-copy New York Times and Amazon bestselling author and Romantic Times award winner for her critically acclaimed women’s fiction novels. Add that to her co-authoring thriller novels with her husband, Michael Harris, and co-blogging with author, Anne R. Allen. This is one talented, busy lady! Her quick mind and witty repartee are keenly evident in her answers to our questions about writing, life, and trying to find a semblance of balance. Join us in welcoming Ruth to our writing stage!

Interviewed By Debbie A. McClure

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Q         Ruth, every writer dreams of hitting the million-seller list, but what has surprised you the most since you reached that mark?

A         What surprised me (even though I was expecting it) is the fact that nothing really changes. Once you’re past the initial thrill, your life goes on. Meals need to be cooked. Laundry needs to be folded. Books are just as easy/hard to write. You have good hair days and bad hair days. Any writer who thinks hitting a best seller list is going to change his/her life is lost in a fantasy.

Q         Writing is a looong journey fraught with many mountains and valleys. What advice would you give to new writers just starting out?

A         Keep it real and get prepared for the long haul.

Q         You also write critically acclaimed thriller novels with your husband, Michael, which is a tremendous accomplishment. What would you say are the benefits and/or downsides to this type of up-close-and-personal collaboration, and why?

A        Well, at least we didn’t kill each other. 😉

Seriously, here’s a look at how it worked (for us) when we had a major disagreement.

http://ruthharrisblog.blogspot.com/2013/08/scene-rescuewhen-collaborators-disagree.html

Q         Who would you say has been your greatest life or career mentor, and why?

A         My father, who LOVED words/language, is remembered by those who knew him (including me) as “always reading.” He was also a news junkie—all traits I inherited from him. My mother was a great story teller. She was an RN who worked in a big city hospital and told sad/funny/outrageous stories of life and death with verve and panache.

Q         Your life goals/dreams have included becoming an ice skater and lawyer, before getting involved in publishing and writing. For the most part, each of these extremely challenging choices focuses on the development of the individual’s skills. What is it about these types of challenges that intrigue and draw you in?

A         They never get boring. Always new ways to fail, new ways to succeed, always something new and different to learn/try/do.

Q         By your own admission you like to write about “strong, savvy, witty women”. What is the message you are trying to convey to women who read your books?

A        Don’t give up! Persistence is the key and don’t feel bad about your neck.

Q        I’m sure you have a very full day, every day. How do you balance life and work to find a reasonably satisfactory compromise?

A         Ha!

Q         It’s interesting to note that you write in several genres. Has it been difficult to find your niche market?

A        Probably. But, as I said above, don’t give up. I’m not.

Q        What has been the most difficult lesson for you to learn, and why?

A        Patience is numero uno!

Q        Could you tell us a little about how you and author Anne R. Allen came to collaborate on a blog?

A        Anne invited me and I said yes. Simple as that.

Q        Like so many other writers, you struggled with blogging and what to blog about. What advice would you give to writers who also struggle with the what, when, where, and why of blogging?

 A        Keep struggling. You’ll think of something! J

Q        What’s next on your agenda, Ruth?

A         I’m writing a series of cozy mysteries set in the small town called New York City. Glam setting. Quirky characters. Friendly natives. Really!

The Gen Delacourt Mystery Series

Molly Greene

Author Molly Greene does more than just write books; although to date she’s written seven! When starting her career in writing, she began blogging about her experiences and sharing what she was learning about the mechanics of blogging and self-publishing with other up-and-coming writers. This has garnered a substantial following for her books and her blog, but it hasn’t been an easy road. Her generosity in sharing what she’s learned has helped others, but of course it’s the books in her mystery series that hold the key to her heart. Read on to learn more about this fascinating writer, her work, and what drives her.

Interviewed by Debbie A. McClure

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Q How did your career in real estate prepare you for your writing life?

A I’m not sure it prepared me so much as it made me realize how badly I wanted to be done with having a boss! Seriously, though, my last twenty years of full-time real estate-related work was as a Marketing Manager for various wholesale mortgage companies. That meant cultivating diverse skills such as flyers created in InDesign and (limited) Photoshop, and lots and lots of copy writing and editing. I use all those skills now as an author, as well as the self-discipline I’ve honed over the years.

Q You’ve written six books in your Gen Delacourt mystery series. What do you find is a) the easiest and b) the most difficult part of writing a series?

A The easiest and most fabulous part is getting to know characters so well that you understand what they would do and say in almost any situation. The hardest part – eventually – will be coming up with plausible cases/situations for them to react to. So far I’ve had great good fortune in thinking up plots, but I fear by the time I get to Book 12, the well may run a little dry.

Q I discovered your blog via an internet search, but was immediately impressed with your “give-back” attitude toward indie writers. What inspired you to take this tactic with your blog?

A When I fired up my website in early 2011, I made an error common to new authors on social media: I began to share what I’d learned as I learned it, and as a result, I wrote blog posts almost exclusively for writers – not readers. I didn’t have a book out yet, I didn’t have readers or fans, so at the time it just made sense to share my self-publishing education with my peers.

Over time, my posts became popular among other authors who were also trying to navigate the learning curve. So my blog’s “give-back” philosophy was a natural offshoot to what I was doing. People helped me, so in turn I reached back to try and make the road easier for those coming behind.

Q What advice would you most like to give to new writers as they begin their journey?

A Great question! Here’s my advice:

* Read heavily in your chosen genre

* Watch what other successful self-published authors do to market themselves and their books

* Follow blogs of authors who share their experiences – it will cut the learning curve time in half

* Try on beta readers until you find two or three fabulous people who will give you good, credible, honest advice about your writing and your plots and characters

* Invest in (at the very least) a great cover and a proof reader

Q Who have been your greatest mentors, either in life or in writing, and why?

A My own poor decisions and errors have provided the greatest growth vehicle in my life, especially once I passed forty and really paid attention to the mistakes I was making, then tried to learn the lessons inherent in them.

In writing/craft, my most important learning vehicle has come from my favorite trad-published authors, Robert Crais, Janet Evanovich’s first few Stephanie Plum novels, and Susanna Kearsley (each at opposite ends of the spectrum with regard to writing style). They create fabulous characters and make me laugh and cry and never want to put their books down.

In the self-publishing industry, it’s been authors like Toby Neal, who I’ve watched closely as she’s worked her butt off and gained great success. That success helped me feel that if she could do it, I could too.

Q What has been the most difficult personal lesson for you to learn, and why?

A Not every person in the world is going to love or value me the way I want to be valued; not every reader is going to like my books and review them the way I’d hope to be reviewed; not every scenario, project, or life situation I develop and nurture will work out the way I plan. Why these have been difficult personal lessons is obvious.

Q If you could sit down at a roundtable of writers either living or dead, who would they be and why would you choose them?

A I’d love to sit at a roundtable of successful self-published authors and listen to a discussion about what they’ve done that’s worked as far as writing, collaboration, budget, diversification of sales platforms, print vs. ebooks, marketing, and promotion, including what has and has not worked, what they would do again, what they’ve heard and seen other successful authors do that they would like to try. THAT would be an interesting couple of hours!

Q What is it about mystery stories that draws you in and holds you?

A I read to be entertained and to learn, so I like mysteries because I can get the feel for characters as they grow through their experiences. I love the page-turning suspense of waiting to see what happens in a well-written plot.

Q What is the most surprising thing you’ve learned about being an indie writer?

A 1) How generous most other self-pubbers are, and 2) how challenging the learning curve is when you first begin, how much there is to do: blogging, social media, writing, publishing, marketing, interviews, promotions … accck!

Q You’ve also written a nonfiction title aimed at self-publishing writers, Blog It. What is the underlying message you are hoping to convey with this book and your blog?

A Blog It evolved from the period of time I was setting up, figuring out, and achieving initial success with my blog. It was tough! There wasn’t a lot of info out there to use as a guide. So I compiled what I’d learned into a book in hopes it would help other authors navigate a little more easily. The message with my book and blog is simple, and exactly what I’ve learned from watching others: “if I can do it, so can you.”

Q Writers, like other artists, struggle with huge amounts of rejection, questioning from well-meaning friends and family, and their own doubts about their writing talent. What would you advise writers in dealing with these issues?

A I might question all the time and effort I put into something when it’s slow to pan out, but I don’t question myself, and no one has questioned me because I never shared my plans to become an author. I just did it. I had three books published before my mother found out!

I believe the greatest rejection-type challenge for authors comes from negative reviews. My advice would be to put it in perspective: Readers come in all types and expectations and desires. Just as I do not necessarily like certain authors’ writing styles and stories, some readers will not like mine. It’s the way it works.

I have the great good fortune – and the life experience – to not pay much attention to what people I don’t know think of me, and I don’t surround myself with people who feel compelled to hand out unsolicited advice. That would be another bit of guidance I’d pass on: take great care about who you hang out with and confide in.

Q I still encounter many writers who aren’t comfortable using social media to connect with other writers and/or readers. Why should they bother with these outlets?

A Connecting with readers is a blast, and one of the most fun elements of being an author, so I have trouble relating to discomfort with that! But if I were a new author starting today, I’d focus on writing a slew of really good books, maintaining accounts on two or three social media platforms that they enjoy using, and building an email subscriber list via a great website. These things, over time, do provide great exposure and will help authors connect and sell books.

When I started blogging and using Twitter in 2011, it was great fun and introduced me to a horde of fabulous writers who remain friends. Sharing and collaboration is valuable and important, just keep it simple. Don’t try to be everywhere at once. I question the value of authors spreading themselves too thin trying to be active on and managing a slew of social media accounts.

Q What’s next for you, Molly?

A The Gen Delacourt Mystery Series Books 7 – 12. That’s it in a nutshell!

Discover more about Molly and connect with her at the links below:

Website: www.molly-greene.com

Twitter: @mollygreene https://twitter.com/mollygreene

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5561802.Molly_Greene

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/molly.greene.7

Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/116507548651091841772/posts