A Chat With Freddi Gold

Freddie Gold

One of the great joys of speaking engagements with writers’ groups is not only making new friends but also hearing about their personal journeys to publication. This time around I’m happy to welcome Freddi Gold, the inventive author of a trilogy she defines as, “Soft Sci-Fi in an adventure, thriller, romantic setting or Romantic Suspense in a science-fictional, adventure, thriller setting.” Fasten your seat belts and enjoy the ride!

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

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Q: Tell us what inspired you to write Dimension Norræna.

A: I had written and published a non-fiction book and except for the leeway I took by inserting scenarios to hold the attention of the reader I found it a lot like writing a thesis. Consequently when I had completed the book I didn’t want to write another in that category. Because the fictional vignettes were a lot of fun to do, I thought I would try fiction. I didn’t prepare much, just started with the idea that I was interested in metaphysics and really enjoyed dystopian novels. I guess you could say that I was inspired by the lure of a new adventure.

Q: Did you always envision this work to be a trilogy or did you reach the end and decide you simply couldn’t let go of your characters?

A: I had just finished reading Hunger Games, followed by Divergent, then Red Rising, 50 Shades of Grey and a host of single dystopian novels so I planned from the beginning to write a trilogy. I didn’t really know how to go about it so I just plunged in. For the first book, I used Al Watt’s, The 90 Day Novel and was motivated to write every day. The characters however, came alive for me and the length of the books gave me ample time to get to know them exceptionally well. At the end, in truth, I hated to leave them. I’d learned so much during the process though, that I looked forward to writing my next book with more discipline, time spent and in a much more studied way.

Q: What are some of the positives and negatives you’ve encountered in penning a series versus a stand-alone title?

A: I’m a very positive, optimistic person, so the negatives mostly seem like learning to me. I tend to turn them around into something beneficial. I realized at the onset that I needed to entice the reader to come back to the story when it ended in the first and second books while I was writing the next one. Because I was so interested in the book, I assumed everyone who liked the first one would be happy to dive right back in—much like how we wait for our favorite series on TV to return for the next season. Waiting a year in between each of them was an extraordinary request. In retrospect, that was asking a lot. If I ever do it again, I’ll release the trilogy once all the books are completed and ready for promotion. Since the romantic suspense aspect was included, I had to find a way to give the reader some satisfaction, without letting them know how things would end. I had to do this again in book two. Some people didn’t want to wait. A positive was that writing each book was exciting because I had to come up with adventures and twists while still heading for the eventual finale. I was able to languish in developing the characters, dreaming and fantasizing about directions to go in. I’m a “pantser” obviously, so I had no idea how the story would end and I found that both alluring and challenging.

Q: You define your book’s genre as “Soft Sci-Fi in an adventure, thriller, romantic setting” or “Romantic Suspense in a science-fictional, adventure, thriller setting.” Why did you have difficulty narrowing down to one genre?

A: Because the story is about a young woman who teleports to another dimension, my critique group and I originally thought the genre would be science-fiction. Once they learned, though, that this happened without the use of a vehicle, it flew in the face of physics. I was using bits and pieces of astrophysical terminology while introducing U.S Intelligence and criminal cartels, a sociopath and a romance or two. Add to the recipe the human-like species on Norræna and another more frightening class of aliens from Møhrkhavn, transhumanism, kidnapping, murder and a dog and soon it was labeled as a fantasy-thriller. Although it’s listed on Amazon under Sci-Fi, for many readers their main enjoyment is the romance and adventure. Verbally I like to say it’s soft sci-fi with a healthy dose of adventurous romance. I do like the term science-fictional which I read in one of the other interviews on this site, though. I think I may use that more.

Q: If your book were to be sold in a traditional bookstore, the obvious question to be posed is what shelf would it go on so that prospective buyers could find it?

A: Good Question! I’ve been looking at reviews and listening to verbal comments from the readers and I was surprised that both men and women really liked the romantic suspense aspect. I was sure most of the women would but surprised by the men. Many of the men sided with one of the males being chosen over the other. Interestingly, many of the women chose the other male. That prompts me to consider including it in the Romance genre. However there isn’t a sub-category for other-dimensional romance and it’s not alien or ghost romance or sci-fi erotica either. Is there a Metaphysical Romance shelf?

Q: Norræna means Nordic and you borrowed most of the Norrænder language from Iceland. How did that play for your readers?

A: I needed a language for the Norrænders. My own efforts looked like gobbledy-gook. I went to Google Translate and looked at translations of some of my lines from the book in a number of foreign languages. I was drawn to Icelandic. It was so unfamiliar to me. I thought it might be to others also. Initially I sought help with the syntax from a wonderful friend in Norway with an Icelandic neighbor to get the syntax right, more so than you could get from Google. I did realize since it was the language of a fictional people, that it did not have to be a hundred percent correct, so I took some liberty to leave out letters or add some or in some cases make up my own words just because they came to me as I was writing. Happily the readers found it both plausible and realistic. I will say it drove some of my critique group-members crazy trying to pronounce some of the terms. I used Dragon Naturally software to convert from audio to type and after a while Dragon learned to spell all the names and words correctly which I found quite humorous.

Q: Do you have a personal connection with Scandinavian countries or ancestry? In other words, what governed your decision to choose that orientation for the storyline?

A: No, I don’t. But I’m drawn there in a kind of mystical way. I’m sure I might have initially lingered in the stereotypical, romantic lure of Viking warriors and it fascinates me archaeologically, but the fact that the novel just poured out of me and leaned to the far north was as much a surprise to me as the next person. The more I wrote, the more natural it felt.

Q: Like many authors, you have gone the self-publishing route. What have you learned from this DIY strategy that you didn’t know when you started?

A: Everything! Being a member of the High Desert California Writers Club and having had the opportunity to listen to a wide selection of authors as invited speakers, I learned that the traditional publishing route was fraught with disappointment, long waits, and rejection. Like the way I wrote the series, I was eager to get the books published. I read The Fine Print of Publishing, by Mark Levine which provided a list of self-publishers in categories from Outstanding to Pretty Good, to Just Okay to Publishers to Avoid. I went right to the “Outstanding” publishers, read their reputations, fees, royalties, printing costs, contracts and other services. I selected Dog Ear Publishing for all of my books.

I found that my out-of-pocket costs could range from roughly $1100 for the least expensive package to $9,000. The packages were very attractive—so many areas to publishing I knew nothing about: interior and cover design, registration with online booksellers and national distributors, Books in Print, ISBN numbers, Library of Congress control number, a webpage for the book. There were add-ons, all for a cost, of course, like, e-book distribution, return policy options, integrated blogs and optimization for Google and others.

Some of my friends were using Create Space, but at the time it not only seemed too technical to me, but as I was teaching college courses every semester and summer classes as well, I just didn’t have the time or the inclination to do all the work it looked like it would be. I spent a lot. While I always had a very attentive author representative and have been more than happy with Dog Ear, I am re-considering the Create Space option to see how much effort might really be involved as the cost is far less, but there are sacrifices to consider as well.

Q: What are you doing to market your work?

A: Looking back there is much I could have done, but didn’t. First I think I should have celebrated the achievement, but I didn’t. I think everyone should reward themselves after writing their first few books, or heck, after any book is published. It’s a Big Deal! I never did a real book launch or did a tour to promote and sell the books. I might still do that. I used some social media, like Facebook and Twitter, but I didn’t keep the latter up. I had a website and I included it on any and all online work I did. I did publicity releases, was in the local paper several times. I did public speaking for a variety of organizations. My non-fiction book was used as a supplementary read for one of my classes and other instructors used it as well. The college bookstore sold it. I do as many book signings as I can work in. I’ve been on panels and been interviewed for blogs. I taught the Artists Way and promoted it there. I have a blog for Dimension Norræna (http://dimensionnorraena.com) and a Facebook page. I have run advertisements in the club state bulletin and locally.

Something new for me is to increase my reviews on Amazon and I plan to try advertising there also. My mind is geared to look for promotional opportunities. It’s a learning process.

Q: It’s rumored that you have an eclectic background. Tell us about it and how this background has influenced your interest in exploring a multiplicity of genres.

A:  When I was twelve I lived in Puerto Rico. TV had not been introduced so I read a lot and one day decided to write a book.  It was very short, about a group of kids who survived a plane crash, completely unscathed on an island in a vast sea, who set up a Robinson Crusoe-like existence and were rescued by page fourteen. I was quite proud of my achievement and wish I had kept it for a good laugh today. As a freshman in high school, I wrote an essay on my desire to become the first female Special Agent for the FBI. My teacher said it would never happen until I learned to spell special. My father wanted me to go to college to find a man who would support me. I majored in Drama my first year in college because my high school drama teacher was very cute. Imagine my surprise when my first instructor was in his eighties. I made my heroine in Dimension a college theatre instructor.

I stayed with my major. It was fun. I hadn’t a clue about how I would support myself or what to do with the degree. I became a flight attendant after my sophomore year, then finished my degree and moved to California. Coming from a long line of teachers, I became one and simultaneously picked up a Masters in the same field. Metaphysics drew me to a Psychic Research Society meeting one night in Los Angeles where I listened to a speaker talk about hypnosis. This led to my taking several years of training in the field of clinical hypnotherapy. I opened up a private practice and soon took an interest in psychology. All of these elements supplemented my character descriptions.

Earning another Masters in Clinical Psychology and a PhD in Human Behavior enabled me to leave high school teaching and become a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. With these credentials and my experience as a Clinical Hypnotherapist, I spent a lot of time doing public speaking, offering classes training other professionals in the health field and giving seminars related to hypnotherapy. A local radio station invited me as a guest on a talk show. This resulted in my having my own radio talk-show until I segued into having my own television talk show.

During all this time I continued with private practice and teaching college classes. I was published in several journals, and magazines and often cited in newspaper articles.

I travelled a bit to Europe, South America and most states, married, had kids and ultimately decided to write the nonfiction book. Joining the Writers Club encouraged me to pursue becoming a writer. I used all of my experience to color the events used in the series.

Q: Your first book, Adultery is Universal But I’m Getting Married Anyway, was nonfiction. What caused you to segue to fiction?

A: Almost all of what I’ve written is from an academic or professional perspective. I wanted to explore other possibilities, but I didn’t think I was creative enough. I also didn’t think I could generate any ideas for a story. I actually dreamed about an out of body kind of experience, and wrote the feelings and visual imagery down. Later when I began the book it occurred to me that it could be an interesting beginning. I altered it as ideas flowed and used the actual memory for another chapter later.  Honestly, it was much more fun to write fiction. I felt excitement to write every day, to create characters, to let my imagination roam free. I still write academic stuff daily. I teach all my classes online.

Q: Was there a purposeful shock element in giving this book a controversial title and incorporating vignettes to illustrate points made throughout the chapters?

A:  Yes. I took a two year program from a company called Mission Marketing Mentors. Among many wonderful ideas and valuable training in marketing a book related to a field I was in (Marriage Counseling), they provided a formula for creating a title that would attract attention, draw in the target audience and provide something that others in my field were not providing. The complete title of this book that was about the evolution of marriage and women’s roles, couple communication, infidelity and statistics was: Adultery is Universal, But I’m Getting Married Anyway: What to Know Before You Do or Already Have. It’s still selling after six years.

The book contains historical information, biological aspects of human beings, belief systems, gender orientation considerations, digital relations and statistical information. So it wouldn’t read like a straight textbook, the writing is casual and the vignettes help to paint a visual for the areas being discussed. My target audience was actually other therapists, but the general population buys it.

I should mention something that crushed me when the book first came out on Amazon. The day after it appeared, someone on a global website called Reddit, wrote that his girlfriend had cheated on him and wrote a book. Then he listed the name of my book and indicated it was on Amazon. A hoard of people then jumped in on the post promising to bash the book so nobody would buy it and they did—about fifteen of them. I didn’t understand what was happening and was devastated. My first book and it was receiving these horrible reviews. After a day or two, a subscriber to Reddit from England e-mailed me to tell me what had happened. I didn’t know him— he just thought I should know. I called Amazon and told them about the situation, but they would not remove the negative reviews. It was incredibly disappointing and frustrating.

Q: Have you been published in other formats besides books?

A: Yes—a little, in clinical journals, magazines on a variety of topics, business newspapers. I wrote for AOL on alternative medicine, and created a booklet for a Parks and Recreation Department for an Arizona city on Creative Drama. I wrote online communication courses for two different colleges and professional courses for the California Board of Behavioral Science and the Board of Registered Nurses. I’ve been published in three anthologies and recently wrote the prologue to a short book of women’s poems.

Q: As still a “newish” writer, where do you aspire to take your writing in the coming years?

A: I plan to focus only on writing novels. I might write a few speeches.

Q: What are the five most recent books you’ve read and how have they contributed to your knowledge base and skill set as a writer?

A:  The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood: Interesting formatting and revealed a different style of writing.

Stephen King/On Writing, Stephen King: I’m in progress-have read the memoir portion so far. Wonderful down to earth, solid advice on improving skills and the crucial importance of reading all the time.

Scotland Forever, Bonnie Watts: a lengthy historical novel set in the highlands of 1600s Scotland. I relished the detailed descriptions of the land, the characters and the story of everyday life in those times. It featured an emerging powerful woman. I learned more about the value and art of story-telling. (I can’t wait for Outlander to return).

The Hunt for Red October, Tom Clancy: My own books include CIA and FBI characters and operations. I wanted to read about earlier events and operations that would give me insight for my scenes. I did learn about roles and chain of command and a lot of technical terminology relative to that story’s situations.

The Kommandant’s Girl, Pam Jenoff: I enjoy historical novels from a wide variety of time periods and countries. Again the art of story-telling, this one about Poland and the Jewish community during the Nazi occupation. I feel that it broadens my intercultural knowledge and understanding.

Q: Besides reading, what else would you suggest to new writers to get them to take the plunge?

A: I believe that if you’ve thought about it, or if people have ever said to you. “You should write a book,” it means you have a story to tell, people like what you are telling them, find you interesting and think you should share it. If you have the itch, the dream, the desire—just do it! Give yourself permission to write badly, too. You can re-write later. A good way to start is to write every day. From more than one source, I learned to write three pages every day. It does not matter what you write about; just write. Write about a dream you had the night before, write about what you have to do and did instead, write about how you feel—about anything. But write every day. Join a writer’s group, a book club. Visit blogs on writing and also the blogs of authors whose books you’ve read and like. Read this blog site! Write a letter to an editor of a paper. Write to a magazine about an article you liked. Write letters or keep a journal. The key thing is to write. Read about or go to meetings to learn about writing and publishing and promoting and if you can, join a critique group. Don’t be afraid—it’s your story or book—other people just make suggestions from their perspective. Use what feels good to you and let the other advice go or keep it for future reference.

Q: What interests or pursuits have you added to your own writing skill?

A:  I like to add a number of different locations in my books and if I can, I use it as an excuse to go there. In addition to using many locations in California and Arizona in my books, I’ve taken the Amtrak Coast Starlight from LA to Canada, gone on a petroglyph tour and another to underground Seattle by Pioneer Square and stayed in the Ecuadorian mountains for a week. I visited an archeological dig there and travelled to different cities. I’ve been to Cabo San Lucas and utilized Google Earth to provide me with imagery for several different descriptions. Not sure if I’ll ever write about the early days of the West, but I subscribed to a couple of magazines (Cowboys & Indians, Wild West) that illustrate a variety of info in case I try that. I plan to get into sculpting again and use it in a scene. I try to stay current on science and new technology and rely on Discover, National Geographic and Archaeology magazines and news stories a good deal. I’m exploring a wide variety of writing aids online, utilize other writing blogs and learn from reading many club member and speakers books.

Q: Tuning out distractions when one is in the midst of wordsmithing is one of the biggest challenges that writers deal with on a regular basis. What’s your own secret for successful coping?

A: Well it’s not music. I tried that, but found myself too involved with the rhythm of the music and the imagery it created—even when I tried different kinds of melodies to help with a scene.

I write when my mind is most active and I am energized which is the first thing in the morning. I feed the dogs and myself, curl up on the couch or sometimes sit on the patio surrounded by trees while the dogs take a second nap. For me—it’s quiet. I don’t look at my cell unless there is a call, which at six am is seldom. I have a loosely constructed map in my mind re how to break up the day to take care of obligations so I’m not worrying about getting other things done while I’m writing. If I need to let the dogs out, or answer the door, I do it and get right back to writing. I try to write at least a chapter at a time. I use the re-write time to edit my work so when I’m writing, I’m just focusing on using my energy to pour out the story, the characters and tone that I want to keep intact.

Q: What are you currently working on?

A:  I’m about 150 pages into a new novel: Name of the Game. It centers around an intuitive-sensitive roughly ten years in the future who assists the CIA with her gifts on a case that includes a covert alien presence among the human population. (I’ve had the good fortune of working with UFO researchers and alien abduction). I’m “pantsing” it, but taking my time to work on the craft in greater depth as well. As soon as summer session classes are over, I’ll start a blog for this book. I’ll likely try writing in other genres as time goes by and I look forward to seeing how I transition to that. I’m also embarking on launching more specific promotion for the Dimension Norræna series. The website is http://freddigold.com. I can be reached at freddigold3@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

 

The Freedom Broker

The Freedom Broker

Thea Paris is one of twenty-five elite kidnap negotiators in the world, and she takes on her toughest case with a special client: her father. The pulse-pounding action unfolds In K.J. Howe’s new thriller, The Freedom Broker, and we’re delighted to put her in the spotlight this week at You Read It Here First.

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

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Q:  You’ve lead an international life with a wide variety of activities. Tell us about some of them.

A:  Growing up, I lived in the Middle East, Africa, the Caribbean, and Europe because my father worked in telecommunications. Adventure and travel have been an important part of my life ever since. I’ve had the pleasure of racing camels in Jordan, ziplining in Costa Rica, diving with Great Whites in South Africa, and interacting with elephants in Botswana. I really enjoy immersing myself in other cultures and learning about them.

Q:  In what ways was that lifestyle influential in prompting the urge to become a writer?

A: I had an eclectic education because of all the travel. Stories were my sanctuary, a lovely escape from the pressures of always being the new kid. I enjoyed reading so much that I wanted to create my own books. I spent years as a medical writer as I worked on my craft and storytelling skills in fiction, and I’m most grateful to have The Freedom Broker out now.

Q:  If you had never left Toronto—or had grown up and stayed in a small community—would you still have started writing novels?

A:  I definitely feel that I would be writing whether or not I’d had my international upbringing, as I love books, stories, and the experience novels provide. I started reading at an early age, and I always wanted to be an author. That said, I believe my choice of international thrillers is firmly rooted in the experiences I’ve had abroad. I work hard to create verisimilitude by immersing myself in the locales I’m writing about, as I love to transport readers there, bringing them the smells, tastes, and sounds of a country. Maybe if I would have stayed in Toronto, I would have written different books—but most likely in the thriller genre.

Q:  What comes first for you—the characters or the plot?

A:  Thea Paris came first, but in thrilleresque fashion, the story raced to close the distance. I wanted to create a strong, talented woman with humanizing vulnerabilities, including Type 1 diabetes. I enjoy books that are character based, so I’m hoping Thea might resonate with people, and perhaps encourage anyone with an illness that they can still reach for their dreams.

Given my extensive research into kidnapping the last three years, I wanted Thea to be an elite kidnap negotiator—a freedom broker—who travels to the world’s hotspots to bring captives back home. The world of hostage retrieval fascinated me, as it lurks in the shadows of society, a heartbreaking and dangerous milieu. Thea Paris became a freedom broker after she witnessed her brother’s kidnapping as a child. While her brother returned home nine months later, he was never the same. As a result, she was determined to help other hostages. There are over 40,000 reported kidnappings every year, and the number continues to grow.

Q:  What attracted you to the thriller genre?

A:  Thrillers appealed to me because I’ve always been a bit of an adrenaline junkie, something that was fostered by my father. He introduced me to motorcycles, scuba diving, and other adventures. I also love whiplash pacing, and the most suitable genre for that is thrillers. And maybe writing suspense novels is my way of vicariously experiencing the life of an action hero!

Q: Who are some of the authors in this genre whose work you especially admire?

A:  David Morrell, also known as Rambo’s Daddy, is an exceptional writer. He has had such a rich and diverse career writing everything from spy novels to historical trilogies to papers on John Wayne. I respect David’s approach to writing as he delves deeply into whatever subject matter he is studying. He is also a guru on the craft of writing, a professor of literature. And creating a new word in the English language—Rambo—is pretty darn sensational.  I also have the deepest respect for Lee Child and his creation of Jack Reacher, Lee’s character is a throwback to a Western hero, a stranger who comes into town and solves a problem, then blows back out with the wind. I love that Reacher doesn’t do laundry, that he doesn’t own a credit card, that he lives by his own rules. It’s refreshing in today’s world to have a character who stands out in the crowd—and not just by his height. And Lee’s prose is tight, smooth—he’s a brilliant author.

Q:  Authors often infuse their fictional characters with aspects of their own personality. In what ways are you and your protagonist, Thea, very much alike? And in what ways are you very much different?

A: Most authors inject themselves into their characters because writing is a catharsis, a way of making sense of our world. I feel a strong collegiality with Thea Paris, as I never wanted the fact that I was a woman to stop me from pursuing any interests. Thea and I share a love for travel and adventure, but Thea is far braver than I am. I’m not big on being shot at, but she rushes into the fray. And Thea has Type 1 diabetes, which is a serious vulnerability for her, especially when she travels abroad, as insulin is her elixir—without it, she would die.

Q:  In Thea Paris’ bio, we learn that her brother’s kidnapping led her to become a negotiator for kidnap situations and an advocate for the families. What in your life prompted you to choose this particular career path for your main character?

A:  With over 40,000 reported kidnappings a year, this issue has become a global crisis. Kidnapping is a purgatory of sorts, as the hostage is alive, but not really living life. Every single item a hostage wants, whether it be food or privileges, he/she must obtain permission for it, a horrible existence.

I spent a lot of time in countries with high threat levels, so there was always a shadow hovering over me—and being abducted was a realistic fear. When I met former hostage Peter Moore, the longest held hostage in Iraq (for almost 1000 days), I had such respect for the courage he showed under enormous duress. Peter was taken hostage along with four British military gentlemen, and sadly, he was the only one to come home alive. What made Peter able to cope?  I explore issues like this in my book. I wanted to create a character who would help bring hostages home, a strong female who would do anything to assist others. And Thea is personally motivated to be a kidnap negotiator because of her brother’s experience. It’s more of a calling than a job.

Q:  The theme of The Freedom Broker had to have involved extensive research in the arena of covert operations. How did you go about identifying expert resources so that your suspenseful plot would ring true?

A:  I attended a kidnap and ransom conference, and I met some fabulous experts who were willing to share their knowledge. From there, I kept building relationships with a variety of people in the milieu, including kidnap negotiators, former hostages, K&R insurance executives, reintegration experts, and the Special Forces soldiers who deliver ransoms and execute rescues. I plan to continue my education on this compelling topic as I write the series.

Q: What was the most intriguing thing you learned from your body of research?

A: The kidnappers usually settle for around 10-15 percent of the original ransom demand—and haggling is an important part of the process to avoid the kidnappers thinking they have a cash cow on their hands. If the hostage’s family doesn’t stretch out the negotiations (which is hard to do when your loved one is in captivity), then the kidnappers might accept the ransom as a first payment and demand more. Also, it’s important to cry poor because if you pay too much, too quickly, then you are seen as a soft target, and the kidnappers might come after you or your family member again.

Q:  Did you envision Thea Paris’ journey to become a series when you started writing your debut novel?

A: Yes, I wanted to create a series character, and I felt a freedom broker had endless story potential. There are many facets of kidnapping, from kidnap for ransom to virtual kidnappings to tiger kidnappings. I could also explore extortion and piracy in the series because Thea works in those areas. And there are endless hotspots in the world, so there are countless settings for future novels.

Q:  Let’s talk about the advantages—and the challenges—in creating and sustaining a series with an overall story arc.

A:  The advantages are many in a series. Readers tend to connect with recurring characters, as they become real to them. It’s incredible to see the fan loyalty with some major fictional characters. I definitely considered the overall story arc, but I also left wiggle room for being impulsive. Like any seasoned operative, Thea left me egress routes all planned out.

Q:  Do you work from an outline or do you let your characters “talk” to you as you work from chapter to chapter? Why does this approach work well for you?

A:  When people ask if I’m a plotter or a pantser, I answer, “pants on fire.”  I’m definitely an organic writer. I do think about the story all the time, but I don’t plot out my novels. Instead, I feel that if I’m surprised, my readers will hopefully be as well. I don’t think there is one right way to write, it’s more a personal decision based on the way you work best. I love creating as I go.

Q:  If Hollywood came calling, who would comprise your dream cast?

A:  Charlize Theron or Mila Jovovich for Thea Paris—I’d like to see a strong, fit woman play her. Phillip Winchester for Rif Asker, as I loved him in Strike Back. And Thea’s brother Nikos, maybe Robert Downey Junior or Lieb Shreiver.

Q:  Do you allow anyone to read your work in progress or do you make them wait until THE END?

A:  I’m happy to have help along the way. It’s good to talk to trusted readers, get feedback.

Q:  When and where do you feel you do your best writing?

A:  I do my best writing on my laptop alone at home on a comfortable couch. Because I travel a lot, I write on planes and in hotel rooms, but my first choice would be home sweet home.

Q:  What do you think readers would be the most surprised to learn about you?

A:  That I’m an introvert at heart. Because I had to integrate into new environments, I’ve had to come out of my shell and become more extroverted, but I truly am introverted and a little shy.

Q:  What’s next on Thea’s (and your own) plate?

A:  I’m doing edits on the second book in the series now, Skyjack. Thea is shepherding two African orphans from Nairobi to London where they are being adopted when the plane they are on is hijacked. The adventures kick off from there. The CIA, the Vatican, secret stay-behind armies from WWII all collide when Thea has a huge challenge in the not-so-friendly skies.

Q:  When you’re not at your keyboard, what do you do for fun?

A: I love sports, especially tennis and swimming. Being out in nature is also very restorative. Travel, adventure, thrills. I love learning new things.

Q:  You’re the executive director of ThrillerFest. Can you tell us more about this conference for thriller enthusiasts?

A:  ThrillerFest is the annual conference for the International Thriller Writers held every July in NYC. It’s a wonderful gathering of over 1000 authors, and we celebrate the genre. We have something for everyone, whether you’re an aspiring author, a fan, or an industry professional. You can learn more via www.thrillerfest.com

Q:  Best advice for aspiring authors?

A:  Be passionate about your subject matter. You will spend so much time working on your books, take your time and choose the genre and topic carefully. And embrace constructive criticism. Writing is a journey of a thousand steps—or more like a million words—so enjoy the process of learning and be kind to yourself. Like any skill, you need practice.

Q:  Anything else you’d like to add?

A:  I love hearing from readers, so if you’re reading this, please drop me a line anytime at kj@kjhowe.com.

I’d like to thank you for taking the time to interview me. It has been a real pleasure.

A Chat With Joan Hall Hovey

Joan Hall Hovey, Photo: Cindy Wilson/Telegraph-Journal

Joan Hall Hovey

Interviewer: Debbie A. McClure

 I’m very pleased to introduce thriller/mystery writer and fellow Canadian, Joan Hall Hovey. Joan has been blessed with a talent for telling dark stories that stay with the reader and keep them asking for more. A self-described “avid listener of stories”, she loves weaving tales that chill to the bone, however she enjoys a quieter, saner life in her lovely home in Saint John, New Brunswick. Welcome Joan!

Q: What is it about writing thrillers and dark mysteries that holds and keeps you?

A: It’s hard to know why I’m drawn to the dark side in the human psyche. Some people can’t get enough romances or westerns. My son and granddaughter are hooked on SciFi, but since childhood you could always get my attention with a good ghost story, or any story that had tension and chilled the blood.  I read everything by Edgar Allan Poe, love the Gothic suspense novels, my favorite being Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre. I collected my pennies and went to see all the scary movies. Later I discovered authors Ruth Rendell, Patricia Highsmith of the Ripley books, and Stephen King.  All those authors have influenced my work in some way.

Q: You often write about strong women who are facing challenges in their life, or who must learn to trust themselves and others. What is it you want female readers to take away from your stories?

A: My main job in writing a suspense thriller is to entertain; to keep my readers at the edge of their collective chairs and turning those pages until the last and hopefully satisfying sentence. The underlying message in my books is that we’re stronger than we think we are. We find this out when we’re forced to draw on that inner strength we didn’t know we had in the face of challenges that can shake us to our very core. Most of the time we manage to come out the other side, not only relatively intact, but often to find we’ve grown in confidence and in our ability to not only survive, but thrive.

Q: What do you think is the future for print and e-books, and why?

A: I think print books will be around for a long time to come, but many people, including me, have also embraced the technological age. I have always had a passion for books. I love the heft of them, the smell, everything about books. Unfortunately, my eyes are no longer as sharp as they once were, and I can make the font on my Kindle as large as I need it to be. Because I like to read in bed (too busy writing and teaching during the day), the Kindle is very lightweight to hold in my hand, so my arthritis is thankful for it.

Q: What advice would you give to new writers just starting out on this crazy journey?

A: Focus on your writing, make it the best it can be, and try to write every day. Pick a time that works best for you. I like to write in the mornings before the rest of the world is quite awake—that time between the black and gray zone. This is how you become a disciplined writer. Learn to do the work whether or not you’re inspired, because a page you’re not happy with can always be edited and improved. The rest—publishing your book, promoting it, etc., can be learned. You can Google anything today.

As far as publishing your work goes, writers definitely have more options today than when I began. You can try for a big publisher through an agent, or a good small press, or you can even self- publish.  If you choose the latter road, keep in mind that you’re solely responsible for everything involving your book’s success. 

Q: Would you say writing the beginning, middle, or end of a book is the most difficult for you, and why?

A: I don’t find one part of the novel more difficult than another. If it’s going well and I am really into my story by experiencing what my characters are experiencing, seeing clearly those scenes in my imagination, I’ll be fine. It’s not easy, although there is nothing I can think of that’s more rewarding. Expect lots of trial and error.  Some authors like to outline, while others write by the seat of their pants. I’m somewhere in the middle. I outline mainly in my head, and take copious notes as I go along. Sometimes a plot problem will solve itself while I’m on a walk, or doing the dishes. Magic happens when you’re there, deep in the book.  Stephen King calls those great gems that come to you when you least expect them gifts from ‘the boys in the basement’.

Q: Many of your books contain an element of the supernatural in them. Have you had any experiences with the supernatural that you can share with us?

A: Yes, there are a few occurrences in my life that caused me to wonder, and sometimes even lose a little slept. I want to keep those to myself, though, so I can draw on them for future books.  

Q: As an actor you have the opportunity to act out characters and experience storytelling in a very different way. Does your acting experience influence how you write?

A: Absolutely. Just as I enter the skin of the character I’m portraying on stage, it is the same with my characters on the page. I really must inhabit their bones, take on the emotions and sensibilities of the character, because it’s how I’m able to grasp that character and make him or her real to the reader.

Q: So many novice writers balk at learning to effectively use social media and the Internet, including Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, blogs and book trailers, in order to connect with other writers and readers. What advice would you give them when it comes to marketing and promoting their work?

A: There are literally thousands of books on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and so on. Readers will simply never find your book if you don’t find ways to point them to it, and we’re so lucky now to be able to take advantage of social media and the internet. Marketing your book is your job as the book’s author; it goes with the territory. It can be the difference succeeding as an author or not, regardless of the level of your talent. I’d suggest spending an hour or two each day on promoting your work.

Q: What have you learned about others since you began writing?

A: I’ve been writing stories and poems since childhood, and then professionally for more than 40 years, so it’s difficult to say. The writing grew and changed as I grew and learned. I believe that’s true for most people. In September 2015, I lost my dear husband of 63 years, following a lengthy illness. It was a numbing shock, even though I knew death was inevitable. It has changed my life in ways that I don’t even understand. I’ve learned that you recognize the changes more with the passing of time, but rarely while they’re happening.

Q: Can you tell us a little about your latest novel?

A: My latest release is titled ‘And Then He Was Gone’. Here is a little about it from the back of the book:

AVAILABLE FROM AMAZON PRINT/EBOOK and other online bookstores.

WHERE IS ADAM?

Julie Raynes’ husband has been missing for six months. Devastated and confused, she refuses to believe that he would leave her voluntarily, though her best friend thinks differently. However, her Aunt Alice, a psychic, tells her Adam has been murdered, and when she reveals how she knows this, any hope that Adam is still alive, dissipates.

The police are also beginning to believe that Adam Raynes was murdered. And Julie is their prime suspect. Her life in ruins, Julie vows to hunt down whoever is responsible for Adam’s murder and make them pay for their crime.

In the meantime, David Gray, a young man who was pulled from a lake by a fisherman when he was 9 years old, wakens from a coma after nearly two decades. Unknown to Julie, Adam and David share a dark connection, a darkness that threatens to devour both of them, in a terrifying race with death.

Q: What’s next for you Joan?

A: Probably another suspense novel, but I want to explore other options as well . I have always loved writing short stories, so I may return to that at some point. I will say that I expect they will also fall somewhere on the dark side.  🙂  

You can find Joan here: http://www.joanhallhovey.com

And she loves to hear from readers.

 

 

 

A Chat With Dan Lombard

Dan Lombard

For as many years as I lived in Northern California – and even the coincidence of penning advertising copy – my path had never crossed that of fellow wordsmith and publisher Dan Lombard.* It was through some of his well-crafted political posts on Facebook that our cyber-paths not only began to cross regularly but soon segued to chats about our joint fondness for fabulous food and travel. When I learned that Death Panel, Dan’s debut novel in 2012, had been followed in rapid succession by several more, I just knew I had to put this prolific author in the global spotlight.

*A mirthful bit of disclosure here is that I’d once had a government coworker of the same name. When I encountered that name again decades later, I couldn’t help but think the passage of time had made DL much more accomplished and interesting. A closer look at his head shot, however, also explained why he never mentioned he remembered me. Because, in fact, we’ve never met.

Interviewer: Christina Hamlett

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Q: If we were to time-travel and take a peek in the bedroom of your 10-year-old self, what clues might give us an indication of what you thought you wanted to be when you grew up?

A: Probably more riddles than clues. I haven’t figured them out yet. Or maybe I just did. Yes, that is it, I was always seeking adventure in the unknown, and back in those days entertainment was very participatory and required imagination, unlike today’s passive entertainment. It was a different place and a different time though. I mean, today I’m reluctant to allow my high school children to go into our local Target store alone. But when I was 15, back in the early 70’s, my buddy and I bought Eurail Passes and toured Europe for a month with nothing but that pass, a few hundred dollars and whatever we could fit in our backpacks. I need to keep that in mind when considering a contemporary audience; their experiences today are completely unlike anything I experienced. Perhaps that is why ageism is prevalent in Hollywood and on 5th Avenue.

Q: Did you have favorite authors/books at that young age?

A: Tolkein of course, the Harry Potter of my generation. Then, not long after it was Ian Fleming, I enjoyed reading about James Bond’s adventures as much as seeing them on screen. It was not until much later in life that I became aware that a favorite childhood movie, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, was written and directed by the same duo, Ian Fleming and Albert Broccoli, who gave us Bond in print and on film. Of course, that made complete sense.

Then it was Leon Uris and above all James Michener (notably The Source) and his ability to draw you into a tale that featured far off places and spanned centuries. At one point I also found an unfortunately misplaced copy of a Henry Miller book, I can’t even remember now if it was Tropic of Cancer or Capricorn. Needless to say, it ruined me. But little did I know it would give me a taste of what would, far in my future, (today) be the model for bestselling novels. At the time I was living in Stockholm, Sweden, a very permissive society in that regard, and on my way home from school every day (yes, in 7th grade) my buddies and I would pass by a number of sex shops. Nobody would ever bat an eye when we’d stop in for a little ogling of the picture books, furthering my youthful debauchery.

Q: And who are your favorites now?

A: I do not read near enough fiction today, either in reprint from generations ago or contemporary. My preference in writing and reading is for books with an (accurate and believable) historic context, Dan Brown being a good example. I do have one peculiarity that I will share. At the age of 25 I read the entire 6-volume set of Winston Churchill’s recounting of World War II. I reread it 25 years later at the age of 50, and expect to do so one more time at 75. However, in between those readings, I do read volume one, The Gathering Storm, alone. That volume contains the instructions on how to avoid reliving the subsequent volumes. History is fascinating, a great teacher and, unfortunately, widely ignored.

Q: What experiences – travel, work, relationships – would you say have/had the most influence on your approach and discipline toward the craft of putting a story together from start to finish?

A: It’s not so much the experiences, but my approach to them. Everything I say, do, hear, think or see is tucked away for future use, whether simply in life, at work, or perhaps to form a plot or subplot in a good story. And in dreams and nightmares, the observations do show there frequently, as well.

Q: Which is more challenging for you as an author – writing a book or writing a short story?

A: If writing was a challenge I would not be writing. Okay, that was snide. A book is more difficult but has less regret. A short story is easier, but I am always left wondering why I didn’t expand that wonderful plot into a more complete work.

Q: Catharsis often factors into the development of works that are deeply personal and/or painful. Your first book, Death Panel, addressed the failure of the medical system during the last four months of your wife’s life following a diagnosis of multiple myeloma. What governed your choice to pen this as a novel told in third-person through fictional characters rather than as a first-person memoir?

A: It was not to shield myself from pain, or to serve as an outlet for the pain. I wanted to be completely honest in recounting my experience, which included some emotions from which I felt I could derive no pride. A reader can tell, though, that the third person is merely a front, so it was not an attempt at deception. But rather to deceive myself, and thinking that, since I had signed a confidentiality agreement with Kaiser when they paid me off, that this was a defense should they decide to come after me for violating that confidence. In retrospect, the best thing possible would’ve been for them to do exactly that, to give me publicity you just can’t buy. And after that ordeal, there really wasn’t any blood for them to get in return.

Q: The reviews on Amazon reflect that the themes which underscore Death Panel have resonated with readers across the country. What was your reaction to the outpouring of vicarious support from total strangers?

A: The reviews were a tremendous reward in themselves, and were sufficient to justify the time spent writing the book. Which is fortunate since, well, there was no financial reward.

Q: Almost on the heels of your debut novel, you entered the self-publishing waters again, this time with a cat and mouse suspense thriller set against a backdrop of California’s high-speed rail system. How did Midnight Departure come about and can we draw from the plot’s prescient context that Dan Lombard is secretly psychic?

A: I actually had been against the bullet train back when it was first proposed at the turn of the century, and even financed a website called StopTheBullet.com. That measure failed, I patted myself on the back for the small part I played, and assumed that was gone. Then it came back, and I thought what a great context in which to place a cat and mouse suspense thriller. Much of what I wrote is happening, not that greed, corruption and government planning are such a novel premise.

Q: Other than flowing prose and compelling dialog, what is the most important consideration as you write?

A: I like to bring together larger concepts and figure out how to work them in together. In the case of Midnight Departure pairing the project to build a $100,000,000,000 high-speed rail system with greed and corruption might have been kind of obvious. In my screenplay Prime Time Crime I chose to pair the notion of seeking fifteen minutes of fame (and the hoped for fortune that follows) with the evolving idea that just about everything we do is, or has the potential to be, surreptitiously recorded. In Last Writes, a short story, I chose to pair a Faustian deal with unforeseen consequences, especially when the devil is the author of those consequences. In the short story Red Ringer I paired the concept of identity theft with the Wild West of the 1880’s. And in Serum 6 I chose a device that is, I think, unusual if not unique. In this medical thriller I create a situation whereby the two protagonists do not realize they are brother and sister (though the reader does) as they get closer to consummating their relationship. Later in the novel, when this knowledge makes all the difference, the roles are reversed: they believe they are brother and sister but the reader now knows they are not.

And finally, most important, as I write, I think, how will this novel translate to the big screen? And, in so doing, how can I avoid stretching credibility?  Not only do I feel compelled to research anything I write for accuracy, but timelines as well. I absolutely detest faulty timelines in writing or in movies. The notion that, in the space of five minutes (five minutes to other characters in the work, not necessarily for the reader), the protagonist can board a plan, fly halfway around the world and confront his nemesis for the final battle, just bothers me.  And bathroom breaks. How can someone live an entire life, or even a month, or a year, in a novel or a movie, and never have to relieve themselves?

Q: When and where are you the most creative at the keyboard?

A: At the strangest of times.

Q: What’s the most unusual object that occupies a space on your desk or the walls of your home office?

A: Perhaps not so much unusual as special. Many years ago I had been publishing a local advertorial magazine and for one issue I featured an artist’s work on the cover. She later confided that had done more than anything to boost her career. I soon began doing this for a different artist on each issue, though no longer as a favor. I am the proud owner of a very nice collection of art by the local art community. In one case I commissioned a piece through this arrangement, bringing the artist two very different historical renditions of William Shakespeare and had her meld them into one. He looks over my shoulder whenever I sit down to write.

Which brings me to the one thing for which I am most grateful. While the Italian language may be wonderful for soaring operatic aria, and French as a musical spoken language lacking hard edges, as a writer, I most grateful that I am an English speaker. It is an incredible language with great depth that allows nuance and poetry within prose. Rules that I can break with abandon; though recognizing the need to avoid the banality of one cliché too many. The downside? A rapidly increasing English speaking population that believes a vocabulary of under one thousand words is sufficient to see one through a lifetime of communicating.

Q: If your writing career came with its own soundtrack, what would it be and why?

A: Magic Carpet Ride by Steppenwolf, one of my ten top favorite tunes of all time, and because if its title.  Any good read should take you on a ride like that, as should the writing itself.

Q: Anticipation or the real thing: which is better?

A: If it is alright I will direct you to the answer to next question as I see them as intertwined. Anticipation is the future, the real thing is history

Q: If someone gave you a crystal ball, would you look into it?

A:  Yes, though I would likely question what I saw.

Q: What are your thoughts on modern literature and the direction it’s taking in the 21st century?

A: The greatest let down was not long after I published my first two novels. First was, after finding my book as one of an estimated 30,000 titles self-published every month, as lost in the wilderness, oblivion, that I would try giving my books away for free on Smashwords.com.  After three months of promoting myself vigorously and watching my rankings inch upwards I found I just could not compete with the porn that was also being given away.  So–no I did not decide to write my own porn–but I did download and read one. We are not talking soft core here, folks.

The second instance was shortly after publishing Midnight Departure I was on a flight back East to visit my parents and struck up a conversation with the fellow on the other side of the vacant seat between us. I gave him a free copy of Midnight Departure, for which he thanked me profusely. Thirty minutes into the flight he pulled Fifty Shades of Grey from his carry-o and was immersed for the rest of the flight. So immersed that he forgot to pack the copy of my book which was left on the vacant seat as we deplaned.

Q: Do you let anyone read your projects while they’re still in progress or do you make everyone wait until after you’ve typed “The End”? What about that method works for you?

A: I don’t really have anyone around me right now that would be particularly interested or have the time to critic a lengthy manuscript, so pretty much rely on myself.

Q: What piece of technology could you not go an entire week without using?

A: The Internet.

Q: What makes writing a joy for you?

A:  As previously stated, the fact that I get to write in English. An amazing language.

Q: What is currently gathering dust in your footlocker or (to channel Hemingway) in your mind ready to bleed from your forehead?

A: Since I have already, in bits and pieces, described the work I have completed, what lies ahead? I have a drama in the works, Jack Rabbit, a story of an accidental con man, which unfortunately will not be completed until long after Danny DeVito has stopped performing in lead roles; I pictured him firmly in my mind’s eye every time I sit down to write a chapter there. I have a great American Novel in the works, in fact in the works for fifteen years now, and largely untouched for the last seven. A paranormal novel that involves time travel, though without the intention or ability to change history.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you and your work?

A: The books are on Amazon, or drop me an e-mail at dan@mailprose.com

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?

A:  The most important part of writing, and the one which can cause the most serious hang-ups (writer’s block) is the segue. It is necessary if you want to weave your tale. Loose ends are to be avoided and ideally, you don’t give your reader a resting place where they can set the book down and resume it later!  Perfectly good, and acceptable, to fool your reader. But if you do fool them, it is best to do so with a V8-style forehead-slapper: leave clever clues.

Humor is always a useful tool in writing. I see humor as having three flavors:

Situational, where you juxtapose two or more unlikely-paired conditions in one scene.

Slapstick, where simply falling down is funny.

Wit, where you use the tool at your disposal, language, to bring a smile.  This is my favorite flavor.

So, to tie it all together, and before I lose my audience, I repeat my favorite quote by my favorite author and conclude the interview:

“Brevity is the soul of wit.”

 

 

Windstalker: Awareness

baginski

The soul that has conceived one wickedness can nurse no good thereafter. -SOPHOCLES, Philoctetes

Science fiction, fantasy, romance and inhuman creatures all blend together in author K.M. (Kisa) Baginski’s debut series Windstalker. In Awareness, the first book Baginski introduces, she spins a tale that introduces a force of evil that preys on a group of unsuspecting young adults sucked into a world of chaos. Note to avid fantasy fans: Be prepared for a lot of suspense, with a little nail-biting thrown in!

Interviewer: Christy Campbell

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Great title by the way! Tell us a bit about Kisa the author and your debut novel, Windstalker: Awareness.

I’m just getting started in the world of writing and look forward to producing much more. For me there was always drive to get particular stories out of my system. I haven’t been in training like many authors I know and respect. In terms of my educational profile, I was always science matriculated. I’ve just wanted to share stories as they come to me. Storytelling is such a beautiful art form. I hope to grow and continue learning as I tell more of them. Awareness is about the Windstalker creature, an evolved Nephilim- half angel and half human. It’s set in New York City and the creature has an impact on a group of unassuming, nonspiritual and emotionally dysfunctional friends. They try to cling to reality for much of the story, ignoring or avoiding the presence of something they can’t rationalize, until they are forced to accept events and circumstances that defy logic. They become aware of the presence of a supernatural force. A Windstalker.

What was your inspiration for writing a supernatural thriller?

I have these amazing vivid dreams from time to time that are a lot like watching a film. They are usually open around the rising action of the story to its climax. The calm just before the storm and, of course, the storm. Windstalker began as one of these dreams.

It came about because as a teen I dreamt from the perspective of a pair of creatures that hovered in an abandoned lot next to a building. The creatures were disguised as swirling wind but could also morph into men, so human beings did not notice them at all. The building was isolated on a dark corner of the street and only significant because of a woman who lived there. She was a sweet, gentle single mother of an infant. Though she was not a particularly noteworthy citizen, one of the two creatures stalked her. And you have to remember the dream was seen from the perspective of the creature. The woman reminded him of a life he had known previously, when human, a life to which he desperately wanted to return. He didn’t say as much to his formless partner as he knew the partner didn’t want to be alone. The longing creature led a sort of tug-of-war among the three as he searched for and tested ways to permanently revert back to human form. Almost ten years later, I hadn’t forgotten the intensity of that dream. So I thought it would be a great start for a novel-writing future. I have many stories that began that way, waiting to surface.

Introduce us to your main characters. What are some of their struggles throughout the story?

Mitchell Geathers is an ambitious young man. He is a leader in his family and maintains a certain level of control. He’s really driven by fear that he will lose control and endanger his loved ones. Chelsea Easton is lost in the real world. She often feels out of place and thinks she has to divert attention away from herself. But being the product of a broken, dysfunctional family, she actually craves love, affection and validation from others.

What makes your novel unique from other paranormal novels out there?

I would say the creature itself. A windstalker isn’t just a shapeshifter. It is a very difficult creature to destroy and can also be reverted into a human being, given a special set of circumstances the reader will have to discover throughout the series.

Were there any authors you read for inspiration while preparing for your first book?

I read a few Victorian Gothic horror novels such as Dracula (Bram Stoker) and The Picture of Dorian Gray (Oscar Wilde). I also read Lolita (Vladimir Nabokov); for a while I toyed with making the character Chelsea younger. I read Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy) for Tolstoy’s panoramic scenes allowing the reader to understand the same incident from another character’s perspective. I thought if I was going to try writing my own novel, I needed to wrap my mind around some of the most celebrated masters of prose and the horror/fantasy genre.

Is this volume one of its kind or will it be part of a series you are developing?

Awareness is the first in the Windstalker series. There are at least two more parts I’m working on now.

In that case, what can your readers look forward to in the next book in your series?

The next book is geared toward discovering the levels of hierarchy within the Windstalker culture. There is a major division within their inner world. An alliance with the peace keepers among them and the stronger group for the time being and a rogue organization seeking to overthrow the peace keepers and establish themselves as supreme leaders of the species.

Fans of science fiction thrillers that touch on romance will easily devour a story like Windstalker. If you could choose a couple of famous folks to play your characters, who comes to mind?

It’s funny but the only character I could see having a famous actor doppelganger is Eli Roberts. I see Eli being played by Charlie Hunnam for some reason.

Give us a few of your favorite films or television shows that might compare to the theme of Windstalker.

I’d like to think Windstalker: Awareness could very well resonate with True Blood, Dexter, Dead Like Me or even Buffy the Vampire Slayer TV fans; or fans of the movie Fallen – for the Grigori Angel mythology. Most of these projects had a dark premise, complex characters and a good mix between horror, romance, thriller and comedy genres.

There are so many online resources today where readers can learn all about their favorite authors. How can readers stay connected to you and any future book projects?

Windstalker stories are available on Amazon and my Windstalker books website. I’ll be announcing any new Windstalker projects as they surface. There is currently a short story prequel (Windstaker: The Fall of Samyaza) and novella about a character named Drew Royce (from Awareness) in development. Both will be released before the second book in the series.

Can you provide your audience with any retail and/or review links as well?

The series website is www.windstalkerbooks.com.

A Conversation with Ruth Harris

Ruth Harris Books

Ruth Harris is a million-copy New York Times and Amazon bestselling author and Romantic Times award winner for her critically acclaimed women’s fiction novels. Add that to her co-authoring thriller novels with her husband, Michael Harris, and co-blogging with author, Anne R. Allen. This is one talented, busy lady! Her quick mind and witty repartee are keenly evident in her answers to our questions about writing, life, and trying to find a semblance of balance. Join us in welcoming Ruth to our writing stage!

Interviewed By Debbie A. McClure

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Q         Ruth, every writer dreams of hitting the million-seller list, but what has surprised you the most since you reached that mark?

A         What surprised me (even though I was expecting it) is the fact that nothing really changes. Once you’re past the initial thrill, your life goes on. Meals need to be cooked. Laundry needs to be folded. Books are just as easy/hard to write. You have good hair days and bad hair days. Any writer who thinks hitting a best seller list is going to change his/her life is lost in a fantasy.

Q         Writing is a looong journey fraught with many mountains and valleys. What advice would you give to new writers just starting out?

A         Keep it real and get prepared for the long haul.

Q         You also write critically acclaimed thriller novels with your husband, Michael, which is a tremendous accomplishment. What would you say are the benefits and/or downsides to this type of up-close-and-personal collaboration, and why?

A        Well, at least we didn’t kill each other. 😉

Seriously, here’s a look at how it worked (for us) when we had a major disagreement.

http://ruthharrisblog.blogspot.com/2013/08/scene-rescuewhen-collaborators-disagree.html

Q         Who would you say has been your greatest life or career mentor, and why?

A         My father, who LOVED words/language, is remembered by those who knew him (including me) as “always reading.” He was also a news junkie—all traits I inherited from him. My mother was a great story teller. She was an RN who worked in a big city hospital and told sad/funny/outrageous stories of life and death with verve and panache.

Q         Your life goals/dreams have included becoming an ice skater and lawyer, before getting involved in publishing and writing. For the most part, each of these extremely challenging choices focuses on the development of the individual’s skills. What is it about these types of challenges that intrigue and draw you in?

A         They never get boring. Always new ways to fail, new ways to succeed, always something new and different to learn/try/do.

Q         By your own admission you like to write about “strong, savvy, witty women”. What is the message you are trying to convey to women who read your books?

A        Don’t give up! Persistence is the key and don’t feel bad about your neck.

Q        I’m sure you have a very full day, every day. How do you balance life and work to find a reasonably satisfactory compromise?

A         Ha!

Q         It’s interesting to note that you write in several genres. Has it been difficult to find your niche market?

A        Probably. But, as I said above, don’t give up. I’m not.

Q        What has been the most difficult lesson for you to learn, and why?

A        Patience is numero uno!

Q        Could you tell us a little about how you and author Anne R. Allen came to collaborate on a blog?

A        Anne invited me and I said yes. Simple as that.

Q        Like so many other writers, you struggled with blogging and what to blog about. What advice would you give to writers who also struggle with the what, when, where, and why of blogging?

 A        Keep struggling. You’ll think of something! J

Q        What’s next on your agenda, Ruth?

A         I’m writing a series of cozy mysteries set in the small town called New York City. Glam setting. Quirky characters. Friendly natives. Really!

The Fury

TheFuryCoverV1

The Mafia, gangs and a killer hyena. Not your typical day in the New York City life of one female detective. In John Reinhard Dizon’s The Fury, readers will delve into a twisted thriller that combines the battle of good versus evil with the modern day realism of an occult world. A fast-paced read, Dizon will both frighten and intrigue with this tale of suspenseful mayhem.

Interviewer: Christy Campbell

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Tell the readers a little about your background. Have you always wanted to be a writer?

I wrote my novella, Enemy Ace, when I was in sixth grade. It was a James Bond knockoff with a German fighter pilot turned British Secret Service agent. I wish I knew what happened to it, maybe it’ll be in a museum someday long after I’m dead. I decided to take my chances when I moved to Missouri ten years ago and submitted a manuscript to Publish America. After having five books published, I decided to try my hand at being my own publicist/agent. I wanted to expand my horizons beyond the POD field, and as it turned out, Netherworld Books shared my vision.

The Fury isn’t your typical horror genre novel, and you took a risk doing so. How did you come up with the premise?

I never wrote anything in the horror genre and took it as a new challenge. A big part of it would be in coming up with a different angle than what is already on the market. Having an African shaman turn into a hyena and be manipulated by West Indian drug gangs in East Harlem is one I hadn’t seen before. My previous experience as a crime fiction writer was a big plus.

Voodoo cults, drug trades, New York City and the Mafia are all featured in your book. How did all of that work together in order to appeal to a common horror fan?

It had to be something that included the Mafia or the book wouldn’t have been realistic, so we have the centuries-old prophecy of an Italian dynasty and French royalty joining to create a demonic kingdom in the New World. The history of voodoo in the West Indies and New Orleans worked perfectly as Bridgette Celine’s ancestry is seen as the missing link between the Rossini Family and Miss Goyette’s voodoo sect. Having a hyena eliminating the competition was the secret ingredient.

You opted for a female main character. Tell us about Bridgette Celine, and what it was like to write from a female point of view.

Bridgette Celine is probably the most aggressive of all my female protagonists in my previous works. She comes from a working-class background and carries lots of emotional baggage that she hides beneath a punk rock demeanor. She handles the danger and the supernatural horror well, but having to deal with her family history leaves her vulnerable and uncertain. People who like strong female characters will love Bridge because she is way over the top. Yet her personality is peeled like an onion as the story progresses, and her different sides gives her the depth of character that makes her special.

I enjoy the challenge of writing from a female perspective. Tiara was largely written from Princess Jennifer’s POV, and Penny Flame focuses on Moneen Murphy’s journey into the unknown. I have a couple more coming up as well -– stay tuned!

Give us the goods on a couple of other characters in the novel. What roles do they play?

Johnny Devlin emerges as the major male protagonist as a street-weary detective in a NYPD ‘black ops’ unit trying to solve the hyena murders plaguing East Harlem. At first he uses his friendship with Bobby Mendoza, Bridge’s boyfriend, to find out more about her relationship with Mafia don Peter Ross. Eventually a mutual respect develops between himself and Bridge, and when he falls in love with her cousin Becca the situation becomes personal. Devlin is used to taking the law into his own hands in dealing with the lowest scum in the NYC underworld, but the Satanists prove to be more than he bargained for.

Anna and Becca, two characters featured, are clearly good people. Is there a downright evil person in your story?

The sorcerer Achok Majok and the voodoo priestess Miss Goyette are the closest resemblances to the Devil Incarnate. Everyone else might find readers seeing them as victims of circumstance. Peter Ross rolls the dice to see if the Satanic prophecy will establish his narcotics empire and loses big-time. Buda Sakumbe is pretty close to what you might call a victim of human trafficking. Even when Bobby Mendoza does a heel turn at the end of the novel, we can see where he was blinded by the demonic promise just like everyone else.

Is there some personal element in your story, or is it just pure fiction?

Lots of the Lower Manhattan scenes were based on personal experiences as a NYC punk rocker in my young adulthood. The characters in Johnny Devlin’s Zombie Squad were all based on people I knew. As a rule, I tend to use real people in my characterizations because lots of the people in my past are so interesting, you couldn’t make them up.

If you were to rewrite your book what changes might you make, if any?

I’d say the editor and I may have dropped the ball in the omniscient narrative as far as the occupants on the second and third floors in the haunted tenement. Miss Goyette seems to move from one apartment to another as do other characters, and it turns into an exercise in postmodernist technique that is too easily perceived as an editing issue. The idea was to convey the sense of helplessness people feel when they get lost in a hostile environment. Ever go into a dark subway, walk all the way to the end of a deserted platform, and find the exit’s locked? Or try to drive through a bad neighborhood at night and find out you misread the map? We should have overemphasized the fact that people kept finding themselves on the wrong floors. Some critics felt like we were the ones who got lost. Regardless of location, the characters make it clear they can’t wait to get out of there.

How about some authors who have inspired you as a writer?

I would have to consider myself a postmodernist author at this stage of my career, and I’ve been studying others of like mind to enhance my own style. Right now I’m reading Kafka; he’s having an enormous influence on my new manuscripts. In my opinion, Shakespeare is the greatest writer of all time, and I’ll have to consider him my greatest overall influence. Ian Fleming was the one who inspired me in my early days, and Robert E. Howard was another one who gave me a new perspective in developing my abilities over the years.

Which horror films or books appeal to you, as a viewer or reader?

As far as horror, nobody touches Stephen King, though I hope readers will make favorable comparisons as my work surfaces. I’ll never forget staying up nights reading Bram Stoker’s Dracula as a school kid. That one stands up against any of King’s books. Moviewise, The Exorcist is the greatest of all time, while I don’t think anyone appreciates the impact Texas Chainsaw Massacre had as the first of the slasher-type flicks. I walked home after the premiere looking over my shoulder.

As writers, we all have habits we employ during a day’s work. What are some of yours?

Lots of times I end up doing more research than writing on any given day. I spent a large amount of time with the historical backdrop on The Fury substantiating the expository narrative. I feel like I’ve validated the work when readers can do some checking up and find out the subplots are based on actual persons, places and events. When I’ve written a dynamic chapter that I know will captivate the audience, I’ll take a break and go for a walk to recharge my batteries and rehearse where the characters are going next. I also enjoy watching pro wrestling to compare notes on how to capture the audience’s imagination with the least dialogue and the most impact.

Where can readers find The Fury, as well as your other novels?

Just plug in John Reinhard Dizon in the Books search engine on Amazon. There’ll be my previous works with Publish America on sale, as well as The Standard available through Tenth Street Press. I take pride in the fact that I don’t allow myself to be confined within any particular genre. Every novel is a new experience that I’m sure the reader will enjoy. I can guarantee that you won’t find any of them a boring read!